Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Losing TouchA man without his body$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jonathan Cole

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198778875

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198778875.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 June 2019

Afterword

Afterword

Personal Perspectives

Chapter:
(p.137) Afterword
Source:
Losing Touch
Author(s):

Jonathan Cole

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198778875.003.0013

In the Afterword some of the neuroscientists and artists give a short appreciation of Ian's contribution and what is was like to work with him. The scientists mention how critical Ian is towards experiments and that he is as careful as them in their design, performance and interpretation. They also relate that they have learned not only from experimental work but also from observing and talking with Ian. Several from the arts, whether in choreography, theatre or magic, were also astonished at Ian's movement abilities given his condition. Lastly a philosopher, Shaun Gallagher and a neuroscientist, Patrick Haggard, return to the human aspect of Ian's narrative. They mention how they have learned the importance of humanizing the experimental subject and that. 'if you want to understand what a particular experience is like, then first-person testimony from people who live with that particular experience is the best bet.'

Keywords:   Mark Mitton, Emma Crichton Miller, SIobhan Davies, Patrick Haggard, Shaun Gallagher

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .