Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Lateness and Modern European Literature$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ben Hutchinson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198767695

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198767695.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 December 2019

Epilogue: The Vertigo of Lateness

Epilogue: The Vertigo of Lateness

Chapter:
(p.330) Epilogue: The Vertigo of Lateness
Source:
Lateness and Modern European Literature
Author(s):

Ben Hutchinson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198767695.003.0019

The Epilogue summarizes the argument of the book in terms of its reconception of modern European literature as ‘late’. Placing this argument in the context of both late modernism and postmodernism—as well as that of the postwar emergence of comparative literature as a discipline—it focuses on the work of W.G. Sebald as an example of the ‘vertigo’ of the contemporary perspective. Haunted by modernity, Sebald’s dense prose style suggests not just the writing of lateness, but also writing as lateness; it thus raises the stakes of Adorno’s definition of late works as ‘catastrophes’ beyond the individual artist’s life (late style), beyond even a particular epoch (late modernism), to modernity as a whole (lateness).

Keywords:   lateness, late modernism, late style, postmodernism, W.G. Sebald, vertigo

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .