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Criminal Justice and Taxation$
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Peter Alldridge

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198755838

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198755838.001.0001

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Investigatory Powers

Investigatory Powers

Chapter:
(p.83) 6 Investigatory Powers
Source:
Criminal Justice and Taxation
Author(s):

Peter Alldridge

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198755838.003.0006

The chapter considers to what extent tax investigations are like, and how they are unlike, police investigations. It examines the powers available to HMRC in the investigation of evasion offences. The bifurcated regime operated clearly in the enforcement activities of Customs and Excise and the Inland Revenue from the earliest times. At the time (early 1980s) of the Keith Committee, before the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) and before the significance of the civil/criminal distinction (in terms of the European Convention on Human Rights) was recognized in English law, police powers were ill-defined and did not allow for a clear comparison to be made between the sorts of rules that might circumscribe the investigations if the objectives were solely (a) to investigate crime or (b) to establish the tax position of the taxpayer. Over time, the investigatory powers have become increasingly closely assimilated to the PACE powers.

Keywords:   dawn raids, investigatory powers, legal professional privilege, privilege against self-incrimination, criminal evidence

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