Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Rise of the Memoir$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alex Zwerdling

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198755784

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198755784.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 August 2019

Inventing the Family Memoir

Inventing the Family Memoir

Edmund Gosse’s Father and Son

Chapter:
(p.33) 2 Inventing the Family Memoir
Source:
The Rise of the Memoir
Author(s):

Alex Zwerdling

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198755784.003.0003

Edmund Gosse’s Father and Son inspects the traditional, hierarchical family from the son’s critical perspective, in which parents are found flawed, imposing the religious dispensation they unquestioningly profess on their child’s malleable clay. From their perspective, their faith is the one true path. From the Son’s, their confidence takes no account of a nascent independence in their child, who becomes conscious of his growing critical awareness—questioning, testing, finding alternative “faiths” more suited to his nature. Yet the Son’s potential rebellion is contained by a deep reluctance to take a different path, in part because his own secular “vocation” as a writer is as compromised as his Father’s unquestioned faith. Their divergent paths are nevertheless both products of a parallel inability to break with the past.

Keywords:   home, filial piety, honoring parents, secular vocation, religious vocation, generational inspection

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .