Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Aristotle in Aquinas’s Theology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gilles Emery, O.P. and Matthew Levering

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198749639

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198749639.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 February 2020

Aristotle’s Philosophy in Aquinas’s Theology of Grace in the Summa Theologiae

Aristotle’s Philosophy in Aquinas’s Theology of Grace in the Summa Theologiae

Chapter:
(p.94) 5 Aristotle’s Philosophy in Aquinas’s Theology of Grace in the Summa Theologiae
Source:
Aristotle in Aquinas’s Theology
Author(s):

Simon Francis Gaine OP

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198749639.003.0005

In contrast to the concerns of more recent accounts of Aquinas’s doctrine of grace with Scripture’s “partakers of the divine nature,” his appropriation of patristic teaching on deification and the Platonic notion of participation, a perception of personalism in his thought, or appreciation of grace’s link to further Scriptural, patristic, or other philosophical and theological themes in his biblical and systematic works, this study treats the creative appropriation within his theology of grace of concepts drawn from Aristotle’s philosophy. Examining the Aristotelian content of questions on grace in the Summa theologiae, it shows how Aquinas put Aristotle’s philosophy to work in the service of his anti-Manichaean and anti-Pelagian theological commitments to the goodness of creation and the primacy of grace.

Keywords:   grace, supernatural, justification, deification, merit, habits, Pelagianism, Manichaeism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .