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Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, Volume VII$
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Daniel Garber and Donald Rutherford

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198748717

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748717.001.0001

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Hobbes’s Galilean Project

Hobbes’s Galilean Project

Its Philosophical and Theological Implications

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Hobbes’s Galilean Project
Source:
Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, Volume VII
Author(s):

Gianni Paganini

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748717.003.0001

Over the last ten years, discussion of Hobbes’s theology has revolved around his provocative notion of a corporeal God, to be found especially in the 1668 Appendix to the Latin Leviathan. However, with few exceptions, scholars have failed to address another important and early work of Hobbes (De motu, loco et tempore), in which he treats philosophical and theological issues at length. This chapter focuses on this work and shows the strong impact of Galilean science on Hobbes, not only for his scientific thought, but also for the construction of a new ‘first philosophy’ and for the treatment of theological topics.

Keywords:   Thomas Hobbes, Galileo Galilei, first philosophy, science of motion, theology, scientific thought

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