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The Penultimate CuriosityHow Science Swims in the Slipstream of Ultimate Questions$
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Roger Wagner and Andrew Briggs

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198747956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747956.001.0001

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A Lutheran Astrologer

A Lutheran Astrologer

Chapter:
(p.221) Chapter Twenty-Eight A Lutheran Astrologer
Source:
The Penultimate Curiosity
Author(s):

Roger Wagner

Andrew Briggs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747956.003.0028

This chapter focusses on the work of Johannes Kepler, a young Lutheran maths teacher at the Stiftsschule at Graz. Kepler was introduced to Copernicus’ theory by his seminary professor, Michael Maestlin, while studying to be a Lutheran pastor. When he published his first book, Mysterium Cosmographicum—The Mystery of the Universe—Kepler had included Rheticus’ Narratio Prima as an appendix. It was in response to being sent this book that Galileo had confessed to being himself a secret Copernican. In their theological attitude to the new theory the two men, though belonging to different confessions, were in effect singing from the same hymn sheet.

Keywords:   Johannes Kepler, Copernicus, Galileo, Rheticus, Mysterium Cosmographicum, Narratio Prima, The Mystery of the Universe, astronomy

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