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Transforming Post-Catholic IrelandReligious Practice in Late Modernity$
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Gladys Ganiel

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198745785

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198745785.001.0001

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Introduction: A Post-Catholic Ireland?

Introduction: A Post-Catholic Ireland?

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction: A Post-Catholic Ireland?
Source:
Transforming Post-Catholic Ireland
Author(s):

Gladys Ganiel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198745785.003.0001

This chapter engages with religious debates about religious markets in Europe, arguing that the religious landscape of the island of Ireland should be considered a ‘mixed’, post-Catholic religious market. It also introduces the new concept of extra-institutional religion, and identifies the three key arguments of the book: (1) extra-institutional religion is significant in the ways it prompts personal transformation, and creates spaces where people work together for religious, social, and political transformation; (2) extra-institutional religion provides a counter-balance to prevailing theories of religious individualization in which the ‘reflexive’, modern religious individual is seen as constructing a ‘God of one’s own’; and (3) extra-institutional religion has the potential to contribute to reconciliation on the island of Ireland, more so than traditional Christian institutions.

Keywords:   post-Catholic, religious markets, extra-institutional religion, reconciliation, religious individualization

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