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The Latin New TestamentA Guide to its Early History, Texts, and Manuscripts$

H. A. G. Houghton

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198744733

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198744733.001.0001

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Catalogue of Latin New Testament Manuscripts

Catalogue of Latin New Testament Manuscripts

Chapter:
(p.209) 10 Catalogue of Latin New Testament Manuscripts
Source:
The Latin New Testament
Author(s):

H.A.G. Houghton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198744733.003.0010

Abstract and Keywords

The Catalogue describes all manuscripts which appear in the three principal editions of the Latin New Testament: the Vetus Latina edition (VL 1–96 and other selected manuscripts), the ‘Stuttgart Vulgate’, and the ‘Oxford Vulgate’. Each of the 174 entries follows a standard format, with details of the current holding institution, the manuscript’s contents, its size and format, other matters of interest, and bibliographical references. Information is also given about facsimiles and, where available, links are provided to complete sets of digital images posted online by the holding institution. Because of the overlap between witness sigla used in the Oxford and Stuttgart Vulgates, a composite siglum has been developed to permit these to be easily distinguished.

Keywords:   Latin, New Testament, Vetus Latina, Old Latin, Vulgate, manuscripts, codex, catalogue, bibliography, register

This chapter offers brief descriptions of the manuscripts cited in the principal editions of the Latin New Testament. All of the manuscripts listed in the New Testament section of the Vetus Latina Register (Gryson 1999) are included in the first section. Details from the Register have been supplemented from other lists (e.g. McGurk 1961a, Metzger 1977, Elliott 1992) as well as fresh research. Manuscripts 9A, 11A, and 19A have been identified since the publication of the Register. The next two sections describe Vulgate manuscripts. The Stuttgart Vulgate uses relatively few manuscripts, and not all are consistently cited in the apparatus.1 The Oxford Vulgate has a much fuller selection, including many famous witnesses. This catalogue can therefore be used alongside all of these editions, as well as others such as NA28 and UBS5 (see the conversion tables in Appendix 1). Other manuscripts occasionally cited in the the Vetus Latina edition are listed in Appendix 2, while Appendix 3 contains additional manuscript of interest for their text of the Gospels. The index of manuscripts in Fischer 1985 and 1986, Berger 1893, McGurk 1961a, and the prefaces to the Vetus Latina editions may be consulted for further details of these.

Holding institutions are listed in their original language apart from the location; some manuscripts are split across more than one library. If the manuscript does not have a shelf number, this is indicated by ‘s. n.’ (sine numero). The approximate page size is given in brackets after the number of pages; the measurement following the number of columns is the approximate size of the text block. In order to take account of variation within manuscripts, these have been rounded to the nearest half-centimetre. For gospel manuscripts, the siglum from Fischer’s collation is given, followed by the percentage agreement with the Stuttgart Vulgate over all test-passages. If the figure for any single test-passage differs from the average by more than 10 per cent, details are provided.2 Abbreviated references to (p.210) the Bibliography are provided for each manuscript. Most of the editions are described in Chapter 6. TM indicates the number in the online Trismegistos catalogue, incorporating the Leuven Database of Ancient Books <www.trismegistos.org>. The original references for the writings of Fischer are followed by details of his two volumes of collected works (Fischer 1985 and 1986) in which the bibliography has been updated. The information given under further literature is not intended to be exhaustive: only the most substantial and/or recent publications are given, and the editions should also always be consulted.

A) The Vetus Latina Register

VL 1

Turin, Biblioteca Nazionale Universitaria, 1163 (G.VII.15)

Codex Bobiensis. Portions of Mark and Matthew.

Copied in Africa in the fourth century. Uncial script.

96 folios (19x16 cm). One column of 14 lines (13½x12 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The beginning of the manuscript is lost, which is likely to have contained John, Luke and the first half of Mark. The extant text is Mark 8:8–11, 8:14–16, 8:19–16:8 (with the short ending) and Matthew 1:1–3:10, 4:1–14:17; 15:20–36. There is no marginal apparatus or other paratext. The text represents the earliest African strand of the Latin Gospels. Paragraphs are indicated by ekthesis and blank space on the previous line, with spaces in the text to mark sense breaks. The nomina sacra are unusual in form (see page 191). Parts of the manuscript are now illegible due to the decay of the parchment caused by the ink.

Facsimile: Cipolla 1913 <https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=iM_sMgEACAAJ>. (CLA IV 465). Image 2 in the present volume.

Edition: Wordsworth, Sanday, and White 1886; Turner 1904a. Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (k) and Oxford Vulgate (k). Fischer Xk: 46.6 per cent (ranging from 35.2 per cent in Mark24 to 58.9 per cent in Matthew11).

Further literature: Turner & Burkitt 1904; von Soden 1909; De Bruyne 1910; Hoogterp 1930; Bakker 1933; McGurk 1961a no. 106; Mizzi 1965; Fischer 1972:31–2 [1986:196–8]; Palmer 1976; Parker 1991; Helderman 1992; Hilhorst 1994; Haelewyck 1999:44–9; Burton 2000:16–17. TM 66572.

VL 2

  1. i) Trent, Museo Nazionale (Castello del Buon Consiglio), s. n.

  2. ii) Dublin, Trinity College, 1709

  3. iii) London, British Library, MS Add. 40107

Codex Palatinus. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

(p.211) Copied in North Italy (Trent?) in the fifth century. Uncial script.

230 folios (35½x26 cm). Two columns of 19–20 lines (22x17½ cm). Purple parchment; silver and gold ink.

i) contains Matthew 12:50–13:11, 13:33–24:49, 28:3–20; Mark 1:21–4:7, 4:20–6:9, 12:38–9, 13:25–6, 13:34–5; Luke 1:1–8:29, 8:49–11:3, 11:25–24:53; John 1:1–18:11, 18:26–21:25; ii) contains Matthew 13:12–23; iii) contains Matthew 14:11–22. An eighteenth-century copy (Rome, Bib. Vallicelliana U. 66) includes the text of Matthew 13:23–33, now lost. There is no prefatory material or marginal apparatus. The text is a later strand of early tradition than VL 1, often close to Cyprian. Parts of John (especially John 10) have a similar text to VL 3.

Images: iii only) <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_40107_f001r>. (CLA IV 437; II p. 17; Suppl. p. ix). Image 4 in the present volume.

Editions: Tischendorf 1847; Souter 1922b; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (e) and Oxford Vulgate (e). Fischer Xe: 52.8 per cent.

Further literature: von Soden 1909; De Bruyne 1910:441; Burkitt 1920; Vogels 1925, 1926a; McGurk 1961a no. 104; Mizzi 1965; Fischer 1972:32–3 [1986:198–201]; Boismard 1993; Haelewyck 1999:43, 49; Burton 2000:17–18. TM 66281.

VL 3

Vercelli, Archivio Capitolare Eusebiano, s. n.

Codex Vercellensis. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

Copied in Italy, probably Vercelli, in the second half of the fourth century. Uncial script.

634 pages (25½x16 cm). Two columns of 24 lines (17x10½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication for the first three lines of each Gospel.

This manuscript is now severely deteriorated, in part because of its use when taking oaths. Pages are missing containing Matthew 25:2–12; Luke 11:12–26, 12:37–59; Mark 1:22–34, 15:15–16:20; Mark 16:7–20 have been added at the end in a Vulgate form. The text is early. There is no prefatory material or marginal apparatus, although a chapter number is preserved at Matthew 28:1. Paragraphs are marked by ekthesis.

Images: <http://purl.org/itsee/parker2008/VL3>. (CLA IV 467).

Editions: Bianchini 1749; Gasquet 1914 (with several misprints and reconstructions based on VL 4, but an improvement on Belsheim 1894); <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). A new edition by Heyworth is in progress using multispectral imaging. Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (a) and Oxford Vulgate (a). Fischer Xa: 60.7 per cent (ranging from 44.1 per cent in Mark24 to 77.6 per cent in Matthew11).

Further literature: Souter 1911; Vogels 1919; Turner 1927; McGurk 1961a no. 108; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:204]; Haelewyck 1999:38; Burton 2000:21. TM 66574.

(p.212) VL 4

Verona, Biblioteca Capitolare, VI

Codex Veronensis. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

Copied in Italy, probably Verona, at the end of the fifth century. Uncial script.

395 folios (28x22 cm). Two columns of 18 lines (17½x15 cm). Purple parchment; silver and gold ink.

A few pages are missing, containing Matthew 1:1–11, 15:12–22, 23:18–27; John 7:44–8:12; Luke 19:26–21:29; Mark 13:11–16, 13:27–14:24; 14:56–16:20. A representative of the Italian text of the late fourth century, although John 1:1–10:12 is slightly earlier. The first page of each Gospel is in gold. The Eusebian apparatus is written in the margins in gold and silver, although this may have been added later.

Images: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. (CLA IV 481).

Editions: Bianchini 1749; Belsheim 1904; Buchanan 1911a; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (b) and Oxford Vulgate (b). Fischer Xb: 71.6 per cent (ranging from 57.6 per cent in Mark21 to 82.6 per cent in John44).

Further literature: Sanders 1922; Mercati 1925; McGurk 1961a no. 109; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:203–4]; Spagnolo & Marchi 1996; Haelewyck 1999:38–42; Burton 2000:19–20, 72–3. TM 66588.

VL 5

Cambridge, University Library, Nn. II. 41

Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark); 3 John; Acts.

Copied around 400, possibly in Berytus. Uncial script (b-d uncial).

406 folios (26x22 cm). A Greek–Latin bilingual manuscript, with the Greek on the left page and the Latin on the right. One column of 33 lines (18½x14½ cm). Parchment; black ink with the first three lines of each book in red.

The opening of the manuscript is missing, as are several quires after the Gospels which may have contained Revelation and the Johannine Epistles; 3 John 11–15 is found on the reverse of the first pages of Acts in Greek. The following portions are lacunose, although those marked with † have been provided on ninth-century replacement leaves: Matthew 1:1–11, 2:21–3:7†; 6:8–8:27; 26:25–27:2; John 1:1–3:16; 18:2–20:1†; Mark 16:6–20†; Acts 8:21–10:3; 20:32–21:1, 21:8–9, 22:3–9, 22:21–28:31. The text of Acts is the longer, so-called ‘Western’ text. In the Gospels, there are early Latin readings although the overall shape is close to the Vulgate. Throughout the manuscript there are harmonizations between the Latin and the Greek. The text is written in sense lines. Eusebian section numbers are found in the margin of the Greek pages. In Mark there are hermeneiai (fortune-telling phrases) in Greek written across the bottom margin.

Images: <http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/MS-NN-00002-00041/>. (CLA II 140). Image 3 in the present volume.

(p.213) Editions: Full transcription alongside digital images above, replacing Scrivener 1864 (also downloadable from <http://epapers.bham.ac.uk/1664>). Cited in Vetus Latina, Sabatier (Cantabr., using a copy made for Bentley), Itala (d) and Oxford Vulgate (d). Fischer Xd: 59.6 per cent (ranging from 42 per cent in Luke34 to 75 per cent in John41).

Further literature: Jülicher 1914; Ropes 1926; Stone 1946; Thiele 1956:90*–1*; Mizzi 1963; Mizzi 1968; Fischer 1972:39–42 [1986:208–11]; Birdsall 1986; Parker 1992; Parker & Amphoux 1996, esp. Auwers 1996; Burton 2000:22–3. TM 61777.

VL 6

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 254

Codex Colbertinus. New Testament (eacrp) including Laodiceans.

Copied in southern France in the twelfth century. Late Caroline minuscule script.

146 folios (26x16½ cm). Two columns of 40 lines (17½x9½ cm in the first half and 18x10½ cm in the second). Parchment; black ink with decoration in red, green, and blue and illustrations at the beginning of each gospel.

The Old Latin element is principally in the Gospels and Acts, with a substantial archaic portion in Mark and Luke and a later Italian Old Latin text in Matthew and John; Revelation and the Epistles are Vulgate. The manuscript begins with Plures fuisse, Nouum opus and canon tables (no divisions). Each Gospel has a prologue and capitula (KA I), with Eusebian apparatus (including parallel passages) in margins. Acts also has capitula and a prologue and is followed by a note on the Passion of Peter and Paul also found in VL 109; the other writings only have prologues, including Primum intellegere (S 669), Epistolae Pauli (S 651), and Primum quaeritur (S 670) before the Pauline Epistles.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8426051s>.

Editions: Vogels 1953; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Sabatier (Colb., his text of the Gospels), Vetus Latina (with the siglum Ω‎C when not Old Latin), Itala (c), and Oxford Vulgate (c). Fischer Xc: 68.3 per cent (ranging from 50.8 per cent in Luke34 to 95.8 per cent in John41).

Further literature: Berger 1893:74–6, 402; Fischer 1972:34 [1986:200–1]; Frede 1975:74–5; Fröhlich 1995:111–12; Haelewyck 1999:42; Burton 2000:27.

VL 7

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 11553

Codex Sangermanensis (primus). The second volume of a Latin Bible, containing the Odes, Wisdom Literature, Old Testament Apocrypha, New Testament (eacrp), and the beginning of the Shepherd of Hermas.

Copied in St-Germain-des-Prés around 810. Caroline minuscule script.

189 folios (40x33 cm). Two columns of 46–52 lines (34–35x25–27 cm). Parchment; black ink with minimal decoration.

This manuscript goes back to a pandect assembled in the fifth century, probably in Rome. The New Testament came from three separate volumes (Gospels, (p.214) Acts–Revelation, Pauline Epistles), as shown by the titles copied in the manuscript. Matthew is Old Latin, and there is a decreasing Old Latin element in the other Gospels; the rest of the New Testament is Vulgate. In 2 Thessalonians, this manuscript alone preserves readings which appear to be that of the Vulgate archetype; in Acts it is the best Vulgate witness by far, and it is also the leading Vulgate witness in the Epistles and Revelation. Preceding Matthew are canon tables (divisions of 4) and capitula for all four Gospels (KA I). The first line of each chapter is written in capitals; Eusebian apparatus is present in the margins (but not with parallel passages). John also features Latin hermeneiai (fortune-telling phrases) corresponding to those in VL 5. Acts is preceded by a unique series of capitula (KA Act Spr), but there are none for the latter books; Acts, the Catholic Epistles, and Revelation all have marginal glosses in shorthand (Tironian notes), including some words in Greek. Many of these are taken from the commentaries of Bede. There are some ninth-century corrections which bring the manuscript into line with Alcuin’s text. Stichometry is present. Readings from the first volume as well as text now missing from this second volume are reported by Stephanus in his Vulgate editions of 1532 and 1538–40; these portions had been lost by the late seventeenth century.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9065958t>. Image 16 in the present volume.

Editions: Sabatier (Sang. 1, Gospels); Wordsworth 1883 (Matthew); <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (g1), Stuttgart Vulgate (G), and Oxford Vulgate (G or g1). Fischer Pg: 88.3 per cent (ranging from 72.9 per cent in Matthew12 to 97 per cent in John44).

Further literature: Harris 1888; Berger 1893:65–72, 408; Fischer 1963b: 576–86 [1985:81–89]; Fischer 1965 [1985:147–8]; Frede 1966: 35–41; Fischer 1971 [1985:390]; Fischer 1972:62–80 [1986:240–50]; Frede 1973; Frede 1975:37–40; Fröhlich 1995:52–3; Burton 2000:26; Bogaert 2013:510.

VL 8

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 17225

Codex Corbeiensis (secundus). Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

Copied in Italy in the fifth century. Uncial script.

190 folios (28x25 cm). Two columns of 24 lines (17x17 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

There are numerous small lacunae as well as the following more substantial missing portions: Matthew 1:1–11:26; John 17:16–18:9, 20:23–21:8; Luke 9:48–10:20, 11:45–12:6. The latter three Gospels are preceded by capitula (KA I). The anti-Marcionite preface to Luke (PROL Lc Pa) follows the capitula. The first line of each chapter is in red with a marginal number; there is no Eusebian apparatus. The text is an Italian form from the late fourth century, very close to the type used by Jerome for his revision of the Gospels.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9065916g>. (CLA V 666). Image 5 in the present volume.

(p.215) Editions: Bianchini 1749; Belsheim 1887; Buchanan 1907; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Sabatier (Corb., Corb. 2), Vetus Latina, Itala (ff2), and Oxford Vulgate (ff2). Fischer Xf: 70.5 per cent (ranging from 53.6 per cent in Mark24 to 83.5 per cent in John41).

Further literature: Sanders 1922; McGurk 1961a no. 61; Fischer 1972:34–6 [1986:200–3]; Vezin 1987; Haelewyck 1999:43; Burton 2000:20. TM 66834.

VL 9

St Petersburg, Russian National Library, O.v.I.3

Codex Corbeiensis (primus). Matthew.

Copied in Corbie (France) in the first half of the eighth century. Cursive and pre-Caroline minuscule script.

78 folios (21x15 cm). Two columns of 19 lines (18½x11 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The text of Matthew has a Vulgate overlay, particularly in the first nine chapters, but there are a number of archaic readings, and an Old Latin portion around Matthew 16–17. There are initial capitula (KA B). The manuscript was bound with a Vulgate copy of Mark 1:1–5:2 written in half uncial in the eighth century (O.v.I.2).

Images: (CLA XI 1623).

Editions: Belsheim 1881. Cited in Sabatier (Corb., Corb. 1), Itala (ff1), and Oxford Vulgate (ff1). Fischer Xo: 83.8 per cent (ranging from 52.4 per cent in Matthew13 to 94.1 per cent in Matthew12).

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 129; Fischer 1972:38 [1986:206]; Burton 2000:28. TM 67789.

VL 9A

St Petersburg, Russian National Library, F.v.I.8

Codex Fossatensis. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in England, probably Northumbria, in the late eighth century. Anglo-Saxon majuscule/Insular half-uncial script.

215 folios (34x24 cm). Two columns of around 25 lines (27½x20 cm). Parchment; black ink with decoration in red, yellow, and blue.

The manuscript begins with Nouum opus, Plures fuisse, Eusebius Carpiano and the prologue and capitula to Matthew (KA C) before the richly-decorated canon tables. The other gospels also have the same capitula but a different set of chapter divisions. Eusebian apparatus is found in all gospels, but missing from the latter half of Matthew. The text is Vulgate with several early readings, especially in the second half of Mark.

Images: Insular Gospels 2001. Certain pages at <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> and <http://www.helsinki.fi/varieng/series/volumes/09/bleskina/>. (CLA XI 1605).

Editions: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Sabatier (Fossat.), Vetus Latina. Fischer Ec: 88.8 per cent (ranging from 65.4 per cent in Mark24 to 97.8 per cent in Matthew13).

(p.216) Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 126; McGurk 1993:248–51; Gameson 1994:35; Kockelkorn 2000; Houghton 2010a; Bleskina 2012; Houghton 2016. TM 67770.

VL 10

Brescia, Biblioteca civica Queriniana, s. n. (‘Evangelario purpureo’)

Codex Brixianus. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

Copied in North Italy, possibly Ravenna, in the sixth century. Uncial script.

419 folios (28x21½ cm). One column of 20 lines (18½x12 cm). Purple parchment; silver ink with gold for the first three lines of each gospel.

The following portions are missing: Matthew 8:16–26; Mark 12:5–13:32, 14:53–62, 14:70–16:20. The first quire of canon tables with quotations is from a different source. The Gospels are preceded by a unique preface, Sanctus Petrus apostolus. Eusebian sections are in an arcade in the bottom margin, with lection numbers in the left margin. The text is close to the Vulgate but has some similarities with the Gothic version.

Images: (CLA III 281).

Editions: Bianchini 1749; Oxford Vulgate (printed under the editorial text); <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina (John), Itala (f), and Oxford Vulgate. Fischer Jg: 81.7 per cent.

Further literature: Burkitt 1900; McGurk 1961a no. 93; Henss 1973; Fischer 1972:37 [1986:205]; Gryson 1990; Haelewyck 1999:43; Burton 2000:27; Falluomini 2012:339–40, 2015:101–3, 178–80. TM 66390.

VL 11

Berlin, Staatsbibliothek Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Depot Breslau 5

Codex Rehdigeranus. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in North Italy (Aquileia) in the first half of the eighth century. Uncial script.

296 folios (cut to 30½x25 cm). Two columns of 20 lines (21–22½x19–19½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication at the beginning of chapters.

The following text is lacking: Matthew 1:1–2:15; Luke 11:28–37; John 1:1–16, 6:32–61; 11:56–12:10; 13:34–14:22; 15:3–15; 16:13–21:25. Eusebian sections are provided in an arcade at the bottom of the page; there are chapter numbers in the left margin. Prologues and capitula are present before Mark (KA I) and Luke (KA B). The text is an Italian Old Latin form of the late fourth century, although Matthew and Mark are close to the Vulgate. Reports that the manuscript was destroyed in 1945 are incorrect.

Images: (CLA VIII 1073; also CLA IX p. 57).

Editions: Vogels 1913; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina (John), Itala (l), and Oxford Vulgate (l, based on Tischendorf). Fischer Xl: 84.2 per cent (ranging from 68.5 per cent in Luke34 to 94.2 per cent in Matthew11).

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 110; Fischer 1972:36–8 [1986:203–5]; Haelewyck 1999:44; Burton 2000:27; Haelewyck 2013:12. TM 67212.

(p.217) VL 11A

Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek, M.p.th.f. 67

Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in the eighth or ninth century, probably in Brittany. Uncial script with Insular features.

192 folios (32x21 cm). Two columns of 20 lines (26x16 cm). Parchment; black ink.

John 18:36–21:25 is missing. There is no prefatory material or Eusebian apparatus; only Mark has a prologue. There are some chapter numbers in the margin (KA I). The text displays block mixture: only certain passages in each Gospel are Old Latin.

Images: <http://vb.uni-wuerzburg.de/ub/mpthf67/index.html>. (CLA IX 1422).

Editions: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina (John). Fischer Bw: 84.1 per cent (ranging from 65.7 per cent in Mark24 to 92 per cent in Luke32).

Further literature: Thurn 1984; McGurk 1987:176; Houghton 2009; Houghton 2016. TM 67561.

VL 12

Vatican City, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Vatic. lat. 7223

Codex Claromontanus. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Matthew was copied in Italy at the end of the fifth century; the other gospels were produced in northern Italy or France in the seventh century. Uncial script.

Matthew consists of 66 pages (25x20 cm); the other gospels are on 217 pages of the same size. Two columns of 23 lines (19x15 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The manuscript originally consisted only of Matthew (the sole Old Latin text, typical of an early Gallo-Irish group) with no prefatory material, but was made into a gospel book in the seventh century with the addition of the other gospels in a Vulgate form (preceded by KA I). The following portions are missing: Matthew 1:1–3:14, 14:34–18:11.

Images: <http://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Vat.lat.7223>. (CLA I 53, 54).

Editions: Belsheim 1892. Cited in Sabatier (Clarom.), Itala (h; Matthew only), and Oxford Vulgate (h). Fischer Xh in Matthew: 71.5 per cent; Jh in the other gospels: 96.4 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 135 & 136; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:203]; Burton 2000:23. TM 66149.

VL 13

Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6224

Codex Monacensis or Codex Valerianus. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

Copied in Illyria (possibly Sirmium) or Italy in the sixth or seventh century. Uncial script.

(p.218) 235 folios (25x21 cm). Two columns of 19–22 lines (16½–18x15½–16½ cm). Parchment; black ink with other colours used in decoration.

There are several lacunae (Matthew 3:15–4:23, 5:25–6:4, 6:28–7:8, 23:13–28; John 10:11–12:38, 21:9–20; Luke 23:23–35, 24:11–39; Mark 1:7–21, 15:5–36). An attempt to change the sequence of the gospels has resulted in several sections being bound in the wrong order. No prefatory material or Eusebian apparatus is present. Lectionary indications have been added in seventh-century North Italian cursive script. The text is Old Latin but with some Vulgate influence: it appears to have been revised on the basis of a Greek text.

Images: <http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/bsb00006573/images/>. (CLA IX 1249).

Editions: White 1888; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (q), and Oxford Vulgate (q). Fischer Xq: 70.9 per cent (ranging from 56.5 per cent in Mark22 to 80.4 per cent in Matthew11).

Further literature: De Bruyne 1911; Souter 1934; McGurk 1961a no. 74; Gryson 1978; Fischer 1972:36–7 [1986:203–4]; Fischer 1980 [1986:301]; Haelewyck 1999:13; Burton 2000:24; Glauche 2000; Falluomini 2015:104. TM 67390.

VL 14

Dublin, Trinity College, MS 55

Codex Usserianus primus. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

Copied in Ireland around 600. Irish half uncial script.

180 folios, with no margins preserved. One column of 22 lines (17½x13 cm). Parchment; black ink. In Matthew and John, the first line of each chapter is in colour.

The manuscript is heavily damaged and the following portions are entirely missing: Matthew 1:1–15:16, 15:31–16:13, 21:4–21, 28:16–20; John 1:1–15; Mark 14:58–15:8, 15:32–16:20. No prefatory material or Eusebian apparatus is preserved apart from a list of Hebrew names before Luke. Some chapter numbers are visible. The text is Old Latin, typical of a Gallo-Irish group including some distinctive readings.

Images: <http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/home/#folder_id=36&pidtopage=MS55_001&entry_point=1>, <http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/content/36/pdf/36.pdf>. (CLA II 271). Image 8 in the present volume.

Editions: Abbott 1884; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (r1), and Oxford Vulgate (r1). Fischer Xr: 68.1 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 84; Fischer 1963b [1985:82], 1965 [1985:196], 1972:36 [1986:203]; Parkes 1992:24; McGurk 1994b; Haelewyck 1999:44–5; Burton 2000:23. TM 66357.

VL 15

Stockholm, Kungliga Biblioteket, A.135

Codex Aureus Holmiensis. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in Southern England (Minster in Thanet?) around 775. Uncial script.

(p.219) 193 folios (39½x31½ cm). Two columns of 24–26 lines (28x24½ cm). Alternating leaves of purple and white parchment; gold, silver, black, and red ink with the text often laid out in a decorative pattern.

Prefatory material comprises Nouum opus, Plures fuisse and canon tables. Each gospel is preceded by capitula (KA B in Matthew, KA I in the other gospels) although these do not match the numbered divisions in Matthew and Luke. Eusebian apparatus in margins. The text is essentially Vulgate (especially in Matthew and the second half of Luke) although portions are a mixed text with occasional Old Latin readings. Luke 21:8–30 is absent.

Images: <https://archive.org/details/urn-nbn-se-kb-digark-4890092> (CLA XI1642).

Editions: Belsheim 1878; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (aur), and Oxford Vulgate (aur). Fischer Ea: 88.4 per cent (ranging from 78.5 per cent in Mark24 to 94.5 per cent in Luke34).

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 111; Fischer 1965 [1985:159, 170], 1972:39 [1986:207]; Gameson 1994:46; Burton 2000:26; Gameson 2001; Fischer 2010. TM 67808.

VL 16

  1. i) St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 1394, pp. 51–88

  2. ii) St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 172

  3. iii) St Gall, Kantonsbibliothek, Vadianische Sammlung, Ms. 70a

  4. iv) Chur, Bischöfliches Archiv, 041.0.1

  5. v) St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 1394 pp. 91–2

  6. vi) St Gall, Stiftsarchiv, Fragmentensammlung

  7. iv) Fragmenta Curiensia; v) Fragmentum Sangallense. Four Gospels (Matthew–John–Luke–Mark).

Copied in Italy in the fifth century; v) is a seventh-century replacement leaf. Uncial script.

Remains of 25 folios (32x22½ cm). Two columns of 24 lines (22x18½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

These are a few pages from a gospel book with an Old Latin text close to VL 3. The contents are as follows: i) portions of Matthew 17–21 and 26–28, Mark 7–9, 13, 15–16; ii) Mark 15 (part of a page also preserved in i); iii) verses from John 19:13–42; iv) Luke 11:11–29 and 13:16–34; v) Mark 16:14–20; vi) portions of John 14:23–18:7. The chapter numbers are written in red in Greek numerals at the top of the page in Matthew and John. There is no Eusebian apparatus. The fragment of John has some Old High German glosses written between the lines. White suggests that i) and iv) are from different manuscripts.

Images: Gamper et al. 2012; i) and v): <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/1394/>; ii) <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0172/258/>. (CLA VII 978a, 978b).

Editions: Gamper et al. 2012; i), iii), iv), v) Wordsworth, Sanday, and White 1886; Bischoff 1946: 420–4; iii and vi) <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited (p.220) in Vetus Latina, Itala (i and iii have the siglum n; iv has the siglum a2; v has the siglum o) and Oxford Vulgate (same sigla as Itala). Fischer Xn: 64.6 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 119 and 120; Fischer 1972:37 [1986:204]; Burton 2000:21–2; Haelewyck 2013:13. TM 67122 and 67123.

VL 17

Naples, Biblioteca Nazionale, lat. 3

Codex Vindobonensis. Portions of Luke and Mark.

Copied in Italy at the end of the fifth century. Uncial script.

143 folios (26x19½ cm). One column of 14 lines (14x14 cm). Purple parchment; silver ink with gold for the nomina sacra.

The first 42 quires are missing, implying that this was a gospel book with the order Matthew–John–Luke–Mark. The extant text is Luke 10:6–14:22, 14:29–16:4, 16:11–23:10 and Mark 2:17–3:29, 4:4–10:1, 10:33–14:36, 15:33–40. The text is an Old Latin form current in Italy in the middle of the fourth century.

Images: (CLA III 399).

Editions: Belsheim 1885; Cited in Itala (i) and Oxford Vulgate (i). Fischer Xi: 70.9 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 99; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:203]; Haelewyck 1999:43–44; Burton 2000:20. TM 66503.

VL 18

  1. i) Darmstadt, Hessische Landes- und Hochschulbibliothek, 895

  2. ii) Donaueschingen, Fürstlich Fürstenbergische Hofbibliothek, 925

  3. iii) Stuttgart, Württembergische Landesbibliothek, HB. VI. 114; VII, 29; VII. 64; XIV. 15

Fragmenta Weingartensia or Fragmenta Constantiensia. Parts of a gospel lectionary.

Copied in North Italy in the seventh century, but palimpsested around 800. Uncial script.

19 folios (23x17½ cm). One column of 17 lines (20x14 cm). Parchment; black ink.

This is one of the earliest surviving Latin lectionaries, containing pericopes of 3 to 15 verses from Matthew, Luke and John. The text is from the later Italian Old Latin tradition but is very close to the Vulgate.

Images: (CLA VIII 1175 and 1176).

Editions: Lehmann 1908; Dold 1923; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina and Itala (π‎). Fischer Xw: 89.9 per cent.

Further literature: Gamber 1962; Salmon 1963; Burton 2000:25. CLLA 261. TM 67314.

VL 19

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, 611, foll. 143–4

Fragmentum Bernense. Fragments of Mark.

(p.221) Copied in the second half of the fifth century, probably in Italy. Palimpsested in the first half of the eighth century. Uncial script.

2 folios (cut to 18½x21½ cm). Two columns of 22 lines (15½x15½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

A witness to the fourth-century Italian text for Mark 1:2–23, 2:22–27, and 3:11–18.

Images: <http://e-codices.unifr.ch/en/bbb/0611/143r/> (CLA VII 867).

Editions: Hagen 1884; Wordsworth, Sanday, and White 1886; Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (t), and Oxford Vulgate (t). Fischer Xt: 76 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 113; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:203]; Haelewyck 1999:45; Haelewyck 2013:14. TM 67010.

VL 19A

  1. i) Durham, Cathedral Library, A.II.10, foll. 2–5, 338–9

  2. ii) Durham, Cathedral Library, C.III.13, foll. 192–5

  3. iii) Durham, Cathedral Library, C.III.20, foll. 1–2

Fragments of Matthew and Mark.

Copied in Ireland or Northumbria in the middle of the seventh century. Insular half uncial script (with Insular minuscule at the end of certain columns).

12 folios (38½x26 cm; originally 47x33 cm). Two columns of 45–51 lines (36x25 cm). Parchment; black ink with coloured decoration.

These leaves from a gospel book were re-used as endpapers in later manuscripts. The contents are as follows: i) Matthew 27:35–28:19; Mark 1:1–4:24, Mark 10:17–14:55; ii) Matthew 14:32–18:29; 22:15–25:26; iii) Mark 4:24–6:6; Mark 8:39–10:17.3 Most of the fragments are Vulgate, but Mark 2:12–6:5 is Old Latin, corresponding to the text of the Gallo-Irish subgroup seen in VL 14. Mark has Eusebian sections (but not canon numbers) in the margin; there is no marginal material in Matthew, but at the end of the Gospel a phonetic Latin representation of the Lord’s Prayer in Greek is written in rubrics.

Images: <https://iiif.durham.ac.uk/index.html?manifest=t1m8g84mm26d>, <https://iiif.durham.ac.uk/index.html?manifest=t2mqj72p7126>, <https://iiif.durham.ac.uk/index.html?manifest=t2mrr171x265> (CLA II 147).

Editions: Cited in Vetus Latina. Fischer Ee: 82.1 per cent (ranging from 72.4 per cent in Mark21 to 88.7 per cent in Mark23).

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 9; Verey 1969–70, 1973; Gameson 2010:24–7; Haelewyck 2013a. TM 66247.

VL 20

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 1395, pp. 430–3

Fragmentum Sangallense. Lection from John.

Copied in Ireland in the eighth century. Irish minuscule script.

One bifolium, in two parts (22½x17 cm). One column of 21 lines (21x14 cm). Parchment; black ink.

(p.222) John 11:14–44, a reading from the Mass for the Dead, now preserved as a single fragment. The text is Old Latin, similar to VL 14.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/1395/430/>. (CLA VII 989).

Editions: Wordsworth, Sanday & White 1886; Bischoff 1946:425–7; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (p), and Oxford Vulgate (p).

Further literature: Berger 1893:31; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:203]. TM 67134.

VL 21

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, O.210 sup., Appendix

Fragments from Luke.

Copied in Italy in the fifth century. Uncial script.

4 folios (23x19½ cm). Two columns of 26 lines (18x17 cm). Parchment; black ink.

Luke 17:3–29, 18:39–19:47, 20:46–21:22 with an Old Latin text similar to VL 3, including a number of archaic readings. The leaves had been used in the binding of another manuscript (O.210 sup.).

Images: (CLA III 360).

Edition: Wordsworth, Sanday, and White 1886. Cited in Itala (s) and Oxford Vulgate (s).

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 98; Fischer 1972:37 [1986:204]; Burton 2000:25. TM 66462.

VL 22

Sarezzano in Tortona, Biblioteca Parrocchiale, s. n. (pars prima)

Codex Sarzanensis. Fragments of Luke and John.

Copied in North Italy at the beginning of the sixth century. Uncial script.

64 folios (30x25 cm). Two columns of 16 lines (17½x16 cm). Purple parchment; silver ink.

This manuscript was found by Amelli in 1872 in a reliquary in the Church of Sarezzano. It is bound with VL 22A. Although badly damaged, with erosion caused by the metal ink, it contains portions of Luke 24 and John 1–11. There are chapter numbers and lectionary indications in the margin. The text is an early Old Latin form, forming a subgroup in John with VL 4 and 14.

Images: 31 plates, 7 in colour, in Ghiglione 1984. (CLA IV 436a).

Editions: Godu 1936; Ghiglione 1984 (only 19 pages); <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (j), and Oxford Vulgate (j). Fischer Xj: 75.1 per cent in John41.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 103; Pagano 1987; Ghiglione 1990; Burton 2000:73. TM 66542.

VL 22A

Sarezzano in Tortona, Biblioteca Parrocchiale, s. n. (pars altera)

Codex Sarzanensis. Fragments of John.

(p.223) Copied in North Italy at the beginning of the sixth century. Uncial script.

6 folios (29x24 cm). One column of 16 lines (15½x15½ cm). Purple parchment; silver ink.

These pages are bound with VL 22 but come from a different manuscript. They contain an Old Latin text of portions of John 18:36–20:14.

Images: 2 plates, 1 in colour, in Ghiglione 1984. (CLA IV 436b).

Editions: Godu 1936; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (j), and Oxford Vulgate (j). Fischer Xj: 82.2 per cent in John41.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 102; Pagano 1987; Ghiglione 1990; Burton 2000:23. TM 66542.

VL 23

Aberdeen, University Library, Papyrus 2a

Fragmentum Aberdonense. A fragment of John.

Written in the fifth century and found in Egypt, possibly the Fayyum. Rustic capitals.

1 page (reconstructed as 10½x8 cm); the fragment itself measures about 2x4 cm. Two columns of 20–21 lines. Parchment; black ink with a red numeral.

Only parts of John 7:27–28 and 30–31 are preserved, along with Eusebian apparatus (including parallel passages) in the left margin. Despite the reconstruction of an Old Latin word order in the editio princeps, the text preserved corresponds to the Vulgate and the Eusebian apparatus supports its identification as Vulgate. Mercati 1953b suggested that it might be part of a Latin Diatessaron but the small format indicates that it is more likely to have been a copy of John alone.

Images: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. (CLA II 118).

Editions: Winstedt 1907; Turner 1939; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited in Itala (23).

Further literature: Mercati 1953b; Fischer 1972:44 [1986:213]. TM 61647.

VL 24

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, M. 12 sup., pp. 119–22

Fragmentum Mediolanense. Johannine lection from a Gallican Sacramentary.

Copied around 700 in southern France; palimpsested in the ninth century. Uncial script.

4 pages (17x14 cm). One column, usually of 14 lines (15x11 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The lection is John 13:3–17. Its text corresponds to the Gallo-Irish group of Old Latin witnesses.

Images: (CLA III 354).

Editions: Wilmart 1922; Dold 1952; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina and Itala (ρ‎). Fischer Xs: 71.1 per cent.

Further literature: Salmon 1963; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:203]; CLLA 205. TM 66456.

(p.224) VL 25

Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, lat. 502, fol. II

Fragmentum Vindobonense. A fragment of John.

Copied in North Italy or France in the sixth or seventh century. Uncial script.

1 page (cut to 23½x16½ cm). Two columns of 30 lines (estimated 20x20 cm). Parchment; black ink.

A single page with John 19:27–20:11. The text has similarities with the Italian Old Latin text preceding the Vulgate. There is no marginal material.

Images: <http://data.onb.ac.at/dtl/3550818>, images 7 & 8. (CLA X 1481).

Editions: White 1888; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited in Vetus Latina, Itala (v) and Oxford Vulgate (v). Fischer Xv: 79.8 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 41. TM 67667.

VL 26

St Paul in Kärnten, Stiftsbibliothek St Paul im Lavanttal, 1/1, fol. 1–2

Fragmentum Carinthianum. A fragment of Luke.

Copied in the sixth or seventh century, probably in Italy. Uncial script.

2 folios (cut to 26x20½ cm). Two columns of 32 lines (22½x19½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

This bifolium containing Luke 1:64–2:51 is bound into another codex as a guard leaf. There are interlinear Latin and Old High German glosses. The early Old Latin text has been partially corrected towards a later Old Latin version.

Images: (CLA X 1449).

Edition: De Bruyne 1923. Cited in Itala (β‎).

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 39; Fischer 1972:36 [1986:203]; Burton 2000:23–4. TM 67636.

VL 27

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 48

Codex Sangallensis (interlinearis). Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in St Gall in 860/70. Irish minuscule script.

199 folios, numbered 1–398 (22½x18 cm). A Greek-Latin bilingual manuscript. One column of 19–27 lines (16½x13 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication in red and yellow.

This is a Greek gospel manuscript (GA 037), with an interlinear Latin version. The translation is based on a form of the Vulgate similar to VgOe E but has been conformed to the grammar of the Greek in many places; alternative renderings are also supplied. It is a sister manuscript of VL 77 but preserves little Old Latin evidence. There is some Latin prefatory material in the opening pages consisting of Hilary of Poitiers’ poem on the Gospels, Nouum opus, canon tables (no divisions), and a preface and capitula to Matthew (KA B). The Greek kephalaia are found at the beginning and inserted into the text of each gospel. John 19:17–35 is missing.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0048/>; Rettig 1836.

(p.225) Edition: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Oxford Vulgate (δ‎).

Further literature: Harris 1891; Frede 1964:50–79; Bischoff 1981:45–7; Kaczynski 1988; Duft 1990; Radiciotti 1998. GA 037.

VL 28

Dublin, Trinity College, MS 56

Codex Usserianus secundus; The Garland of Howth. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in Ireland around 800. Irish majuscule script.

86 folios (24x17½ cm). One column of 26 lines (19–20½x14½–15½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

There are lacunae spanning Matthew 27:59–28:20, Mark 5:31–6:13, and Luke 1:1–13, 23:15–24:53, while in John only 5:12–10:3 is extant. There is no marginal material. The text is an Irish mixed text, with a concentration of Old Latin readings in the latter half of Matthew, where it is one of the most non-Vulgate texts.

Images: <http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/home/index.php?folder_id=1647%26-pidtopage=MS56_009%26entry_point=9> (CLA II 272).

Editions: Lawlor 1897:186–201 (Matthew); Hoskier 1919; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina (John), Itala (r2), Oxford Vulgate (r2) and Abbott 1884. Fischer Hg: 78.9 per cent (ranging from 56.5 per cent in Matthew14 to 85.8 per cent in Luke31).

Further literature: Berger 1893:42; McGurk 1961a no. 85. TM 66358.

VL 29

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 13169

Codex Sangermanensis secundus. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in Brittany in the tenth century. Caroline minuscule script.

166 folios (21½x14 cm). One column of 24–30 lines (16½x10½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication and coloured decoration.

The prefatory material consists of Nouum opus, Sciendum etiam, Plures fuisse, the argumentum and capitula to Matthew (KA A, incomplete), and then the canon tables. Eusebian apparatus varies: it is absent from Mark; Matthew and Luke have section and canon numbers in the margin; John includes details of parallel passages. There is a blank space for capitula before Mark and Luke; John has KA Pi. The text is mixed, with readings shared with the Insular Vulgate manuscripts. In John, lectionary headings have been integrated into the gospel, affecting the neighbouring text.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10500013s>.

Edition: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Sabatier (Sang. 2), Vetus Latina (John), and Oxford Vulgate (g2). Fischer Bg: 88.8 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:48, 408–9; Fischer 1972:38 [1986:206].

VL 30

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, nouv. acq. latin 1587

Codex Gatianus. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

(p.226) Copied in Brittany around 800. Celtic half-uncial script.

109 folios (30½x24 cm). One column of 27–29 lines (25x19½ cm). Parchment; black ink with yellow and red decoration.

There is no prefatory material, apart from a carpet page before Matthew; chi-rho in Matthew is also decorated. Eusebian apparatus is in the margins in black and red. The text is mixed, with readings shared with the Insular Vulgate manuscripts. The archaic cata is used in some of the titles.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8423842n>. (CLA V 684).

Editions: Heer 1910; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Bianchini 1749 (John to Mark); Vetus Latina (John), Sabatier (S. Gat.), and Oxford Vulgate (gat). Fischer Bt: 86.5 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:46–7, 410; McGurk 1961a no. 63; Fischer 1965 [1985:134, 251], 1972:38 [1986:206]; McGurk 1987:176; Lemoine 2004. TM 66851.

VL 31

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, T. 27 sup.

A collection of liturgical rites, including biblical lections.

Copied in North Italy in the eleventh century. Late Caroline minuscule script.

61 folios (19x13½ cm). One column of 30 lines (14x9 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The lections occur in an ordo scrutiniorum (foll. 6–26) compiled at the end of the sixth century. The New Testament readings are from Matthew, Mark, Luke, Romans, and 2 Corinthians. Some are Old Latin, others Vulgate in affiliation.

Edition: Lambot 1931.

Further literature: Morin 1934.

VL 32

Wolfenbüttel, Herzog-August-Bibliothek, Weißenburg 76

Lectionarium Guelferbytanus. Gallican lectionary.

Copied in France (Clermont-Ferrand?) in the first half of the sixth century. Palimpsested around 700 in Burgundy. Uncial script.

100 folios (cut to 25½x18½ cm). One column of 26 or 28 lines (21½x16½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

Both Old and New Testament lections; the latter come from all books apart from Revelation and the shorter epistles. Some passages occur more than once, with a different text; certain lections are conflations from multiple books. The affiliation ranges from Old Latin to Vulgate.

Images: <http://diglib.hab.de/mss/76-weiss/start.htm>. (CLA IX 1391, 1392).

Editions: Dold 1936; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina (John) and Oxford Vulgate (Romans only). Fischer Gw: 88.9 per cent (ranging from 77.7 per cent in John44 to 92 per cent in Luke31).

Further literature: Morin 1937; Berti 1954; Gamber 1959; Fröhlich 1995:17–18; Carmassi 2008. TM 67531.

(p.227) VL 33

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 10439

Codex Carnotensis. John.

Copied in Italy around 500. Uncial script.

263 folios (7x5½ cm). One column of 11 lines (5x3½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

This small-format gospel was found in an eleventh-century reliquary in Chartres in 1712. Certain pages have faded, including the initial dedicatory page. There is no other prefatory material or paratext. The affiliation is Old Latin in parts of John 1–5 and Vulgate for the rest of the gospel.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b52503882m>. (CLA V 600).

Edition: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited in Vetus Latina. Fischer Jc: 95.5 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:89–90, 407; McGurk 1961a no. 60. TM 66731.

VL 34

Grottaferrata, Biblioteca della Badia, Γ.β‎.VI

Codex Cryptoferratensis. A lection from John.

The manuscript is made up of palimpsested leaves from a Greek euchologium. The text of John 1:1–17, which was read in both languages on Easter Day, is found in Latin. The first 14 verses correspond to the Vulgate; the last 3 are an ad hoc translation with no Old Latin ancestry.

Editions: Cozza 1867:336; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>.

VL 35

Dublin, Trinity College, MS 60

Book of Mulling; Liber Moliensis. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in Ireland (probably St Mullins) at the end of the eighth century. Irish minuscule script.

84 folios (16½x12 cm). Normally two columns of 28 lines (13x9 cm); this increases up to 47 lines (and one page of three columns) towards the end of the manuscript. Parchment; black ink.

Prefatory material includes prologues and canon tables. Eusebian apparatus in margins. The text is an Irish mixed text with a strong Old Latin element in Luke 4–9. There is a diagram on the final page which is believed to be a plan of the monastery at Tech-Moling. Four further pages from another eighth-century manuscript were found in the shrine of St Moling containing portions of Matthew 26–27 and Mark 1–6 and are kept with this manuscript; these also have a mixed text.

Images: <http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/home/index.php?folder_id=1648%26-pidtopage=MS60_001%26entry_point=1> (CLA II 276).

Editions: Lawlor 1897 (selections); <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina (John). Fischer Hm: 83.2 per cent (ranging from 58.4 per cent in Luke32 to 92 per cent in Mark22). The additional manuscript is Fischer Hn: 88.3 per cent.

(p.228) Further literature: Berger 1893:33–4; McGurk 1956; Willis 1959; McGurk 1961a no. 89; Willis 1966b; Doyle 1967; Doyle 1972; Fischer 1972:38 [1986:206]; Nees 1983. TM 66362.

VL 36

Formerly Giessen, Universitätsbibliothek, 651/20

Fragment of Luke.

Copied in Italy in the early sixth century, but excavated in Egypt. Uncial script.

One fragment from a bifolium, comprising a part of each page plus the central margin. (Original single page size c. 26x18 cm). A Gothic-Latin bilingual manuscript with the Gothic on the verso and the Latin on the recto.4 One column of 24 or 25 lines (estimated as 19x15 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The Latin text comprises parts of Luke 23:3–6 and 24:5–9. The text has Old Latin and Vulgate readings. Eusebian sections are indicated in the margin. The manuscript was destroyed through water damage in 1945.

Images: <http://papyri-giessen.dl.uni-leipzig.de/receive/GiePapyri_schrift_00007340>. (CLA VIII 1200).

Edition: Glaue & Helm 1910.

Further literature: Burkitt 1910b; Henss 1973; Gryson 1990; Falluomini 2010, 2015:35–6. TM 61726.

VL 37

Boulogne-sur-Mer, Bibliothèque municipale, 42 (47)

Jerome’s Commentary on Matthew (HI Mt).

Copied in north-eastern France at the end of the eighth century. Early Caroline minuscule script.

189 folios (29x20 cm). One column of 20 lines (22½x15½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

The biblical lemmata in this commentary have been extended by means of an Old Latin source, identical to VL 38.

Images: <http://bvmm.irht.cnrs.fr/consult/consult.php?reproductionId=87>. (CLA VI 736).

Edition: Souter 1937.

Further literature: TM 66905.

VL 38

Vatican City, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Palat. lat. 177

Jerome’s Commentary on Matthew (HI Mt).

Copied in Lorsch around 880. Anglo-Saxon minuscule script.

123 folios (31½x17½ cm). One column of 30 lines (24x13 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The biblical lemmata in this commentary have been extended by means of an Old Latin source, identical to VL 37.

(p.229) Images: <http://digi.vatlib.it/view/bav_pal_lat_177>. (CLA I 79).

Edition: Souter 1937.

Further literature: TM 66175.

VL 39

Poitiers, Médiathèque François-Mitterrand, MS 17 (65)

Gospels of Sainte-Croix of Poitiers. Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in Amiens at the end of the eighth century. Uncial script.

214 folios (31x23 cm). Two columns of 26–28 lines (24½x18 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The text of the Gospels is Vulgate. The first series of canon tables quote an Old Latin text (also in VL 40). The prefatory material is unusual, consisting of a rare translation of the Letter to Carpianus, the canon tables with incipits, Nouum opus, a regular set of canon tables, and Aileran’s poem on the canons (AIL Eus), followed by a picture of Christ in Majesty. The list of lections at the back of the manuscript reproduces a Roman exemplar of 740. All gospels have capitula (KA I). The same set of Hebrew names is found in VgOe Q.

Images: (CLA VI 821).

Editions: Minard 1945; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John canons). Canon tables cited in Vetus Latina (John) as a patristic witness. The main manuscript is Fischer Pa: 96.4 per cent.

Further literature: Minard 1947; Fischer 1965 [1985:155–6]; McGurk 1961a no. 64; McGurk 1994b; Palazzo 2006; Herbert 2012. TM 67601.

VL 40

Vendôme, Bibliothèque municipale, 2

Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in France, probably in the tenth century. Caroline minuscule script.

158 folios (33x24 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The text of the Gospels is Vulgate. The canon tables quote an Old Latin text (as in VL 39).

Images: <http://bvmm.irht.cnrs.fr/consult/consult.php?reproductionId=8644> (four pages).

Editions: Minard 1945; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John canons). Canon tables cited in Vetus Latina (John) as a patristic witness.

Further literature: Fischer 1965 [1985:155].

VL 41

Verona, Biblioteca Capitolare, VII

Lections from Matthew.

Copied in Verona in the first half of the eighth century. Uncial script.

24 folios (21½x14½ cm). One column of 19 lines (17½x11½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

(p.230) The manuscript consists of Matthew 1:18–9:9 divided into lections. The text is mostly Vulgate with some influence from VL 4, which served as a local text in Verona for several centuries.

Images: (CLA IV 482).

Edition: Vogels 1952. Fischer Xu: 79.9 per cent.

Further literature: Fischer 1965 [1985:197], 1972:36 [1986:203]. TM 66589.

VL 42

Cambridge, University Library, Ff. IV.42

The Cambridge Juvencus. Juvencus, Euangeliorum libri IV (JUV).

Copied in Wales in the second half of the ninth century. Insular minuscule script.

55 folios (25x18½ cm). One column of 27–33 lines (21x15 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The Latin text of Juvencus was glossed by at least thirteen scribes in Latin, Old Welsh, and Old Irish. Gryson 1999 notes that some of the Latin glosses on the Gospels correspond to non-Vulgate forms paralleled in Gildas.

Images: <http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/MS-FF-00004-00042/1>; McKee 2000a.

Edition: McKee 2000b.

Further literature: Haddan & Stubbs 1869:198; Zangemeister 1877:548–550; McKee 2000c.

VL 435

Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, lat. 563, foll. 122–77

Fragments from Matthew.

Copied in Italy in the fifth century; palimpsested in the first half of the eighth century in North Italy. Uncial script.

51 folios (20½x15 cm). One column of 10 lines (11½x8–9 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The underwriting contains portions of Matthew 26:56–28:2 (and the Gospels of Thomas and Nicodemus). Burton 1996 suggests that it was part of a Latin–Gothic bilingual.

Images: (CLA X 1485).

Edition: Philippart 1972. Fischer Xp: 72.2 per cent.

Further literature: Despineux 1988; Burton 1996, 2000:25; Falluomini 2015:103–4. TM 67671. <http://data.onb.ac.at/rec/AL00173440>.

VL 44

Cambridge MA, Harvard University, Houghton Library, Ms Typ 620

Rosenthal fragment. A fragment of Luke.

(p.231) Copied in Ireland in the second half of the eighth century. Irish majuscule script with minuscule elements.

One page, missing three margins (23x17 cm). One column of 27 lines (23x16 cm). Parchment; black ink.

Portions of Luke 16:27–17:26 are preserved on this leaf which was used in a binding. There is a chapter number but no evidence of any Eusebian apparatus. The text is similar to VL 28.

Images: <http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:3429165>; Bischoff & Brown 1985 (no. 1819; plate IIIb).

Editions: Cited in Itala (λ‎).

Further literature: Burton 2000:25. TM 68689.

VL 45

Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 29270/1

A fragment of Matthew.

Copied in the fifth century in Italy; palimpsested in the late eighth century in Salzburg. Uncial script.

One fragment from a bifolium (cut to 10x22 cm) used in a binding, preserving portions of two folios and the central margin. Three columns of probably 17 lines (originally around 13x15½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

Portions of Matthew 9:17–10:10, with an Old Latin text representing an early revision with a high proportion of ancient readings. The fragment formerly had the classmark Clm 29155g.

Images: <http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/bsb00001703/image_11>.

Edition: Fischer 1980 [1986:279–81]. Cited in Itala from an earlier transcription (μ‎).

Further literature: Fischer 1980 [1986:275–307]; Bischoff & Brown 1985 (no. 1843); Burton 2000:25. TM 68708.

VL 46

Laon, Bibliothèque municipale, 473 bis

Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in France in the first half of the ninth century.

The text of the Gospels is Vulgate. The initial series of canon tables (foll. 1–19) quote a similar Old Latin text to those in VL 10. The manuscript has been damaged by water.

Edition: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John canons). Canon tables cited in Vetus Latina (John) as a patristic witness. The main manuscript is Fischer Pl: 95.9 per cent.

Further literature: Fischer 1965 [1985:155–6].

VL 47

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 60

John.

(p.232) Copied in Ireland around 800. Irish majuscule and minuscule script.

34 folios, numbered 1–68 (26½x18 cm). One column of 26 lines (21x14–15 cm). Parchment; black ink with yellow and red decoration.

There is no prefatory material. Eusebian apparatus (with parallel passages) and chapter numbers in margins. Parts of John 1–3 are Old Latin (although there are numerous contemporary corrections in John 1); the rest is Vulgate.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0060/>. (CLA VII 902).

Edition: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited in Vetus Latina. Fischer Hu: 82.5 per cent (ranging from 68.8 per cent in John41 to 90.9 per cent in John42).

Further literature: Berger 1893:56; McGurk 1961a no. 118; Mizzi 1978. TM 67046.

VL 48

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 51

Four Gospels (Matthew–Mark–Luke–John).

Copied in Ireland at the end of the eighth century. Irish majuscule script.

134 folios, numbered 1–268 (29½x22 cm). One column of 24 or 25 lines (22–25x15½–16½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication; coloured evangelist portraits and full-page illustrations of the crucifixion and last judgement.

There is no prefatory material or Eusebian apparatus. A carpet page precedes the decorated chi-rho page. This is one of the most archaic Old Latin texts of the early chapters of Matthew; the other books have an Insular Vulgate text. Luke 22:25–55 is missing.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0051/>. (CLA VII 901).

Editions: <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina> (John). Cited in Vetus Latina (John). Fischer Hs: 83.3 per cent (ranging from 69.1 per cent in Matthew11 to 91.5 per cent in Luke34).

Further literature: Berger 1893:56, 416; McGurk 1961a no. 117; McNamara 1990, 2001, 2002. TM 67045.

VL 49

Verona, Biblioteca Capitolare LI (49), fol. 19v

Lection from John.

A marginal annotation written in Verona in the eighth century in cursive minuscule script on folio 19v. The manuscript itself was copied around 500, possibly in Verona, in uncial script, and is also designated as VL 183. It is a collection of Arian homilies.

The lection consists of John 12:12–13 (titled Lectio de oliua), with a distinctive early Old Latin text almost identical to VL 2.

Images: (CLA IV 504).

Editions: Gryson 1982; <http://iohannes.com/vetuslatina>. Cited in Vetus Latina as a patristic witness.

(p.233) Further literature: Capelle 1910; Bischoff & Brown 1985:354; Spagnolo & Marchi 1996. TM 66611.

VL 50

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Laud gr. 35

Codex Laudianus, Laudian Acts. Acts of the Apostles.

Copied in Sardinia or Rome in the sixth or seventh century. Uncial script (type b).

227 folios (27x22 cm). This is a Latin–Greek bilingual manuscript. Two columns of 24 to 26 lines (20x16 cm); the Latin is in the left column and the Greek on the right. Parchment; black ink.

Acts 1:1–2 and 26:30–28:25 are missing. The text is written in short sense lines. The Latin was based on a European Old Latin text which has been accommodated to the Greek. There is no marginal material.

Images: <https://digital.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/inquire/p/55b2e494-4845-403e-9ba6-d812bda79329>. (CLA II 251).

Editions: Tischendorf 1870; Belsheim 1893. Cited in Sabatier and Oxford Vulgate.

Further literature: Jülicher 1914; Laistner 1937; Fischer 1972:29 [1986:194]; Walther 1980; Boismard & Lamouille 1984; Petzer 1988; Gibson 1993:22; Petzer 1993a; Parker 2008:289–90; Lai 2011. TM 61729.

VL 51

Stockholm, Kungliga Biblioteket, A. 148

Codex Gigas or Gigas librorum. Bible and other texts (New Testament eacrp, including Laodiceans).

Copied in Bohemia (probably Podlažice) between 1204 and 1227. Minuscule script.

309 folios (cut to 89½x49 cm). Two columns of 106 lines. Parchment; black and red ink with coloured decoration.

Only Acts and Revelation are Old Latin, in which this manuscript is the principal witness to the fourth-century Italian text. The other books are Vulgate. Laodiceans is placed after Hebrews.

Images: <http://www.kb.se/codex-gigas/>.

Editions: Belsheim 1879; Vogels 1920. Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate.

Further literature: Ropes 1926; Friedl 1929; Frede 1966:288–90; Fischer 1972:29 [1986:194–5]; Fischer 1975 [1985:417]; Frede 1975:15–16; Gryson 1988:419–20; Fröhlich 1995:19–20; Gryson 2000–3:10.

VL 52

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, B. 168 sup.

Fragmenta Mediolanensia. Two martyr narratives.

(p.234) Copied in North Italy in the second half of the eighth century. Uncial and early Caroline minuscule script.

Three folios (26½x18½ cm). One column of 30 lines (20½x14½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

The leaves contain the Martyrdom of St Stephen extracted from Acts (6:8–7:2, 7:51–8:4), preceded by the Martyrdom of St Vincent. The text is an Old Latin form close to VL 51.

Images: (CLA III 310).

Editions: Ceriani 1866:127–8. Cited in Oxford Vulgate (g2).

Further literature: Fischer 1955 [1986:56], 1965 [1985:193], 1972:29 [1986:195]. TM 66407.

VL 53

Naples, Biblioteca Nazionale, lat. 2

Codex Bobiensis, Codex Vindobonensis. Fragments of Acts and the Catholic Epistles.

Copied in Italy in the sixth century; palimpsested in Bobbio in the eighth century. Half-uncial script.

20 folios (cut to 23x17 cm). One column of 24 to 25 lines (17½x12½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

The text consists of Acts 23:15–23, 24:4–28:31; James 1:1–2:11, 2:16–3:9, 3:13–5:20; 1 Peter 1:1–18, 2:4–10. Acts was described by Jülicher as a recension based on the Vulgate and a Greek text, removing interpolations (see Fischer 1972:30); the two letters have a predominantly Vulgate text with some earlier readings.

Images: White 1897. (CLA III 395).

Editions: White 1897; Bick 1908. Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate.

Further literature: Fischer 1955 [1986:56, 61], 1972:30, 85, 88 [1986:195, 266, 269]. TM 66498.

VL 54

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 321

Codex Perpinianensis. New Testament (eapcr).

Copied in Roussillon in the second half of the twelfth century. Minuscule script.

240 folios (19x13½ cm). Two columns of 30 lines (13x9 cm). Parchment; black ink.

Acts 1:1–13:6 and 28:16–31 are Old Latin; the rest of the manuscript is Vulgate although there are a few earlier readings in Paul.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8442902q/>.

Editions: Berger 1895; Blass 1896; Buchanan 1911b. Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate.

Further literature: Berger 1893:77–9, 404; Fischer 1955 [1986:56]; Andorf 1964; Frede 1966:264, 288–90; Fischer 1972:30, 67 [1986:195, 242], 1975 [1985:417]; Frede 1975:16–17.

(p.235) VL 55

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 6400 G, foll. 113–30

The Fleury Palimpsest. Portions of Acts, Catholic Epistles, and Revelation.

Copied in the fifth century, probably in Italy. Palimpsested in the seventh or eighth century in France. Uncial script.

18 folios (cut to 25x18 cm). One column of 23 lines (19½x17 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The original sequence appears to have been Revelation, Acts, Catholic Epistles. The following portions are extant: Revelation 1:1–2:1, 8:7–9:12, 11:16–12:14, 14:15–16:5; Acts 3:2–4:18, 5:23–7:2, 7:42–8:2, 9:4–24, 14:5–23; 17:34–18:19; 23:8–24; 26:20–27:13; 1 Peter 4:17–5:14; 2 Peter 1:1–2:7; 1 John 1:8–3:20. The text of Revelation and Acts is an early African form slightly postdating Cyprian; the Catholic Epistles have a text immediately preceding the Vulgate.

Images: <https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b105154335/>. (CLA V 565).

Editions: Berger 1889; Buchanan 1907 (corrections in Buchanan 1911a:198); Vogels 1920:209–12; Ropes 1926. Cited in Sabatier (Reg. 5367), Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate.

Further literature: von Soden 1909; Vogels 1920; Fischer 1955 [1986:56], 1972:27, 29 [1986:192, 194]; Gryson 2000–3:10–11. TM 66695.

VL 56

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, nouv. acq. latin 2171

Comes Silensis. Lectionary (Liber comicus).

Copied in Silos in the middle of the eleventh century. Visigothic minuscule script.

222 folios (36x26½ cm). Two columns of 25 lines (24½x16½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink with other colours in the decoration.

There are readings from most biblical books: in the New Testament, Acts, Epistles, and Revelation feature Old Latin readings in an otherwise Vulgate text. This is the principal representative of the younger tradition of the Liber comicus.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8457362r>.

Editions: Morin 1893; Pérez & González 1950. Cited in Vetus Latina (usually as τ‎56) and Oxford Vulgate (t). Fischer Ws: 85.5 per cent (ranging from 73.5 per cent in Matthew14 to 95 per cent in Matthew12).

Further literature: Férotin 1912:885–8; Thiele 1956:39*–40*; Frede 1975: 86–7, 1006–16; Fröhlich 1995–8:143–5; Gryson 2000–3:48.

VL 57

Sélestat, Bibliothèque Humaniste, 1A

Lectionary containing readings from the Old Testament and Acts of the Apostles.

Copied in the eighth century, probably in North Italy. Uncial script.

78 folios (18½x12 cm). One column of 17 lines (14½x9 cm). Parchment; black ink.

(p.236) Seven lections are included from Acts: 2:1–3:13, 4:31–5:11, 7:2–10, 8:9–9:22, 9:36–42, 12:1–17, 19:4–17. The text is an Old Latin form close to VL 51.

Images: <http://bhnumerique.ville-selestat.fr/bhnum/player/index.html?id=MS01A&v=161&p=1>. (CLA VI 829).

Editions: Morin 1913:440–56.

Further literature: Morin 1908; Fischer 1965 [1985:193], 1972:29 [1986:195]. TM 67609.

VL 58

Orlando (Florida), The Scriptorium, VK 799

Codex Wernigerodensis. New Testament (epacr) including Laodiceans.

Copied in Bohemia (possibly Tepl) in the second half of the fourteenth century. Minuscule script.

251 folios (14x10½ cm). One column of 33 lines (11x7 cm). Paper; black ink with rubrication.

There are a large number of interpolations in Acts which may derive from Old Latin sources; the rest of the manuscript is Vulgate, marked by the incorporation of much additional material, and features numerous Czech glosses. Laodiceans occurs between Colossians and 1 Thessalonians.

Editions: Cited in Oxford Vulgate (Acts only).

Further literature: Berger 1893:80; Blass 1896; Frede 1966:288–90; Fischer 1975 [1985:416–7]; Houghton 2015b.

VL 59

Codex Demidovianus. Bible.

Copied in Burgundy in the second half of the thirteenth century.

272 large format folios (the last 60 of which contained the New Testament). The manuscript has been lost since the late eighteenth century, but readings for the New Testament are reported in Matthaei’s edition. The text is Vulgate, but related to the Florus Bible (Paris, Bibliothèque de l’Assemblée nationale, 1) and also Spanish manuscripts.

Editions: Matthaei 1782–8. Cited in Oxford Vulgate (dem); occasionally cited in Vetus Latina with the siglum λ‎D.

Further literature: Berger 1893:80; Thiele 1956:14*–15*; Frede 1966:35–40; Frede 1973; Fischer 1972:69 [1986:245], 1975 [1985:419]; Frede 1975:79–81; Fröhlich 1995:124–5; Gryson 2000–3:40.

VL 60

Formerly Sarriá (Barcelona), Colegio Máximo S.J., s. n.

Lectionary with Acts and Epistles.

Copied in Catalonia in the thirteenth century, but destroyed in the Spanish Civil War. The affiliation is Vulgate apart from two pericopes on folios 112–13, which have an Old Latin text of Acts 1:15–26 similar to VL 67.

Edition: Bover 1927.

(p.237) VL 61

Dublin, Trinity College, MS 52

Liber Ardmachanus; Book of Armagh. New Testament (epcra including Laodiceans) and hagiographical material.

Copied in Ireland, probably Armagh, in 807/8. Irish minuscule script.

217 folios (19½x14½ cm). Two columns of 34–40 lines (14–16x10½–12 cm). The columns are sometimes subdivided further for lists. Parchment; black ink.

The manuscript consists of texts relating to St Patrick (foll. 2–24), some written in Old Irish, the New Testament (foll. 25–190), and Sulpicius Severus’ Vita Martini (foll. 191–220). Matthew 14:33–21:4 is missing. The affiliation is Vulgate apart from the Pauline Epistles and Old Latin readings in Acts and Revelation. Matthew is preceded by Nouum opus, canon tables (no divisions), and capitula for all four Gospels (KA I). There is a decorated chi-rho monogram. There are prologues and lists of Hebrew names before each Gospel and the Pelagian prologues to the Pauline Epistles, but no marginal numbers or Eusebian apparatus; the Catholic Epistles have chapter numbers; Revelation has a unique numbered summary (KA M); Acts has numerous marginal annotations and glosses. There are also stichometric numbers. Laodiceans appears between Colossians and 1 Timothy.

Images: <http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/home/#folder_id=26&pidtopage=MS52_01&entry_point=1>, <http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/content/26/pdf/26.pdf> (foll. 2–48). (CLA II 270).

Editions: Gwynn 1913. Cited in Vetus Latina (not Gospels) and Oxford Vulgate (D). Fischer Hd: 88.5 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:31–3, 380; Sparks 1954a; Frede 1961:59–86; Fischer 1962 [1985:32, 55]; Thiele 1965:132–6; Frede 1966:277–284; Fischer 1972:38–9, 52–5 [1986: 206–7, 224–5]; McNamara 1987; McNamara 1990:140–160; Colker 1991:93–97; McGurk 1994b; Fröhlich 1995:21–24. TM 66356.

VL 62

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 6, 1–4

Biblia de Rosas, Bible de Roda. Latin Bible (eacpr including Laodiceans).

Copied in Santa Maria de Ripoll in the middle of the eleventh century. Catalan minuscule script.

566 folios in four volumes (48x33 cm). Three columns of 50–1 lines. Parchment; black ink with rubrication and decoration in blue and yellow.

The fourth volume (113 folios) begins with a list of lections, Nouum opus, incomplete canon tables (divisions of 5), Ammonius quidam, and Plures fuisse. All books are preceded by prologues (sometimes more than one) and capitula. In the Passion narratives, the words of Jesus are written in red. The Gospels have full Eusebian apparatus in the margin with parallel passages. The text of Revelation is divided to make space for illustrations on each page. 2 Timothy 4:5–Hebrews 13:25 and Revelation 12:12–16:11 and 22:14–21 are missing. The New Testament is Vulgate, apart from Old Latin readings in Acts (especially (p.238) Acts 11–12), including interlinear alternatives. Laodiceans appears between Colossians and 1 Thessalonians.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b90669191>.

Editions: Cited in Vetus Latina (sometimes with the siglum κρ‎) and Oxford Vulgate (R: Acts only).

Further literature: Berger 1893:24–6, 400; Fischer 1962 [1985:13, 51], 1963b [1985:86]; Thiele 1965:94–5; Frede 1966:23–4; Fischer 1972:69 [1986:246]; Klein 1972; Delcor 1974; Frede 1975:78–9; Fröhlich 1995:116–22; Gryson 2000–3:39; Contessa 2003, 2008.

VL 63

Ann Arbor MI, University of Michigan, Ms. 146

Acts of the Apostles.

Copied in England in the first half of the twelfth century.

78 folios. Acts is written in a central column, with commentary on either side taken from Bede and Hrabanus Maurus. In the fifteenth century the manuscript was bound with a thirteenth-century manuscript of Revelation and the Catholic Epistles.

The text is Vulgate with Old Latin readings.

Edition: Sanders & Ogden 1937.

Further literature: Petzer 1988.

VL 64

  1. i) Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6436

  2. ii) Munich, Universitätsbibliothek, 4o 928 frg. 1-2 (=Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6436/20)

  3. iii) Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6436 (from Clm 28135)

  4. iv) Göttweig, Stiftsbibliothek, s. n.

  5. v) Göttweig, Stiftsbibliothek, s. n. (a)

  6. vi) Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6436/11

  7. vii) Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6230

  8. viii) Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6436/21 (from Clm 6220 and Clm 6277)

  9. ix) Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6436/16

    Fragmenta Frisingensia; Freising Fragments. Fragments of the Pauline and Catholic Epistles.

    These fragments have two origins.

  10. i–iv) are 28 folios (26x17½ cm) from a manuscript of the Pauline Epistles copied in the second half of the sixth century, probably in Africa. Uncial script. One column of 32 lines (21x13½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

  11. v–ix) are 5 folios (22½x17½ cm) comprising replacement leaves for Paul and parts of the Catholic Epistles, copied in the first half of the seventh century, probably in Spain. Uncial script. One column of 32 lines (20½x13½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

(p.239) The contents are as follows: i) Romans 14:10–15:13; 1 Corinthians 1:1–3:5, 6:1–7:12, 7:19–26, 13:13–14:5, 14:11–18, 15:14–43, 16:12–24; 2 Corinthians 1:1–2:10, 3:17–5:1, 7:10–8:12, 9:10–11:21, 12:14–13:10; Galatians 2:5–3:5; Ephesians 1:16–2:3, 2:6–3:16, 6:24; Philippians 1:1–20; 1 Timothy 1:12–2:15, 5:18–6:13; Hebrews 6:6–7:5, 7:8–18, 7:20–8:1, 9:27–10:9, 10:11–11:7; ii) Galatians 3:5–4:3, 6:5–18; Ephesians 1:1–1:13; iii) 2 Corinthians 5:2–12, 5:14–6:3; iv) Galatians 4:6–5:2; v) Romans 5:16–6:19; vi) Philippians 4:11–23; 1 Thessalonians 1:1–10; vii) 1 Peter 1:8–19, 2:20–3:7; viii) 1 Peter 4:10–2 Peter 1:4; ix) 1 John 3:8–2 John tit.

The text is an Old Latin form almost identical to that used by Augustine. There is no marginal material. The first page of 1 Thessalonians is divided into paragraphs of 5–6 lines. There is a stichometric indication at the end of 1 John.

Images: <http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/0011/bsb00110737/images/index.html> (CLA IX 1286a, IX 1286b, X p. 2, XI p. ix, Supp. p. ix).

Editions: De Bruyne 1921. Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate (r).

Further literature: Souter 1927:149–54; Schäfer 1929:69–97; De Bruyne 1931a; Schäfer 1939:11–14; Thiele 1956:43*–4*, 70*–1*; Frede 1964:102–17; Thiele 1965:91–2; Frede 1975:18–21; Fröhlich 1995:24–5. TM 67428.

VL 65

London, British Library, Harley 1772

Codex Harleianus. Pauline Epistles, Catholic Epistles, and Revelation.

Copied in northern France, probably Reims or Cambrai, in the second half of the ninth century. Caroline minuscule script.

146 folios (29x18½ cm). One column of 27–31 lines (apart from two columns on foll. 104–5); written area 22½x13½ cm. Parchment; black and red ink with coloured decorations. There is also a runic dedication written by the scribe Iuseus.

The manuscript is badly damaged; 3 John, Jude, and Revelation 14:17–22:21 are missing. The text is mostly Vulgate, with Old Latin portions at 1 Peter 2:9–4:15, 1 John 1:1–3:15, and Hebrews 10–13; the last of these was missing from the main exemplar, which was also used for Metz 7.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=8617> (nine folios).

Editions: Buchanan 1912 (omitting 1 John 3:16–2 John). Cited in Vetus Latina (sometimes with the siglum ZH) and Oxford Vulgate (Z).

Further literature: Berger 1893:50–1, 387; Schäfer 1929:102–113, 143–151; Thiele 1956; Frede 1964:142–3; Thiele 1965:92–3; Fischer 1965 [1985:158–9]; Frede 1974:129–148; Fröhlich 1995:79–80; Gryson 2000–3:25. TM 66302.

VL 66

St Petersburg, National Library of Russia, Q.v.I.39

Corbey St James. Epistle of James and other texts.

Copied in Corbie around 830. Caroline minuscule script.

24 folios (23x19 cm). One column of 21 lines (16–18x13½–15 cm). Parchment; black ink.

(p.240) The manuscript contains Novatian De cibis iudaicis, a Latin translation of the Epistle of Barnabas and, on foll. 20–4, an Old Latin text of James produced around 400 in Rome.

Editions: Belsheim 1883. Cited in Sabatier, Vetus Latina, and Oxford Vulgate.

Further literature: Wordsworth 1885; Sanday 1885; Jones 1947 (esp. 388); Thiele 1956; Fischer 1965 [1985:155]; Frede 1974:255–6; Kraft 1977.

VL 67

León, Archivo Catedralicio, 15

Palimpsestus Legionensis. Remains of a Latin Bible (epcar).

Copied in the seventh century, possibly in Toledo. Palimpsested in the tenth century with Rufinus’ translation of Eusebius’ Historia ecclesiastica in Visigothic minuscule. Spanish half-uncial script.

The original manuscript consisted of around 322 folios, of which 48 remain (original size at least 48x35 cm). Two columns of 71–6 lines (36½x28½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

The New Testament portions remaining are Romans 11:2–16:6; 2 Corinthians 1:1–7:4; 12:18–end; Galatians 1:1–3:29; 1 Thessalonians 2:16–2 Thessalonians 3:2; James 4:4–1 Peter 3:14; 1 John 1:5–3 John 10; Acts 8:27–11:13, 14:21–17:25. The Catholic Epistles and parts of Acts are Old Latin, with different text-types in different portions (Acts 15:6–12 and 26–38 are very early, with similarities to Cyprian); Paul is a good Vulgate text.

Images: (CLA XI 1636 and 1637).

Editions: Fischer 1963a (Acts), Berger 1893:9–10 (1 John). Cited in Vetus Latina, and Stuttgart Vulgate (l; Acts and Paul).

Further literature: Berger 1893:8–10, 384; Thiele 1956:16*–17*, 84*ff.; Fischer 1963a [1986:74–105], 1963b [1985:73–8]; Bogaert 2012:74–5. TM 67802.

VL 68

Toledo, Catedral, Biblioteca del Cabildo, 35–8

Comes Toletanus. Lectionary (Liber comicus).

Copied in Toledo in the ninth century or later. Visigothic minuscule script.

112 folios (32½x26½ cm). Two columns of 30–1 lines (26x21 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The beginning and end of the manuscript is missing. This manuscript is a witness to the older Liber comicus tradition: there are readings from most biblical books, with occasional Old Latin forms.

Edition: Pérez & González 1950. Cited in Vetus Latina (usually as τ‎68). Fischer Wt: 89.6 per cent.

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Rivera Recio 1948; Thiele 1956:39*–40*; Mundó 1965.

VL 69

León, Archivo Catedralicio, 2

(p.241) Comes Legionensis. Lectionary (Liber comicus).

Copied between 1065 and 1071, possibly in León. Visigothic minuscule script.

82 of around 300 folios are extant (40x28 cm). Two columns of 26 lines. Parchment; black ink.

There are readings from most biblical books in the younger Liber comicus tradition, preserving occasional Old Latin forms (cf. VL 56).

Edition: Pérez & González 1950. Cited in Vetus Latina (usually as τ‎69). Fischer Wl: 92.9 per cent.

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Gryson 2000–3:49.

VL 70

Madrid, Real Academia de la Historia, Aemil. 22

Comes Aemilianus. Lectionary (Liber comicus).

Copied in San Millán de la Cogolla in 1073. Visigothic minuscule script.

195 folios (38½x27 cm). Two columns of 26 lines (28½x19 cm). Parchment; black and red ink with coloured decorations.

There are readings from most biblical books in the younger Liber comicus tradition, preserving occasional Old Latin forms (cf. VL 56).

Images: <http://bibliotecadigital.rah.es/dgbrah/i18n/consulta/registro.cmd?id=67>.

Edition: Pérez & González 1950. Cited in Vetus Latina (usually as τ‎70). Fischer We: 86.3 per cent (ranging from 73.8 per cent in Matthew14 to 93.7 per cent in Matthew12).

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Frede 1975:86–7; Fröhlich 1995:146–7; Gryson 2000–3:49.

VL 71

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 2269, foll. 17–48

Comes Carcassonensis. Lectionary (Liber comicus).

Copied in Septimania around 800. Palimpsested in Carcassonne in the twelfth century. Visigothic minuscule script.

16 folios are extant (originally 38x32 cm). Two columns of 30–1 lines (28½x21½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

This is a witness to the younger Liber comicus tradition. In the New Testament, readings are extant from Matthew, Luke, John, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Philippians, Hebrews, James, 1 and 2 Peter.

Edition: Mundó 1956:243–74. Cited in Vetus Latina (usually as τ‎71).

Further literature: Mundó 1954; Thiele 1956:39*–41*. TM 68773.

VL 72

Toledo, Catedral, Biblioteca del Cabildo, 35-4

Lectionary (Liber misticus).

Copied in Toledo around 1200 (although some sources give a ninth century date). Visigothic minuscule script.

(p.242) 175+2 folios (34½x28 cm). Two columns of 27 lines (28½x22 cm). Parchment; black ink.

In the main part of the manuscript the New Testament readings are from the Gospels, Acts, Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, 1 Thessalonians, and Revelation. The last two leaves are from a Liber comicus copied in the late eleventh century with New Testament readings from Matthew, John, Romans, 1 Corinthians, 1 Thessalonians, and James. All text corresponds to the younger Liber comicus tradition.

Edition: Pérez & González 1950 (last two leaves). Cited in Vetus Latina (usually as τ‎72). Fischer Wc: 90 per cent.

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Mundó 1965; Fröhlich 1995:147–8; Gryson 2000–3:50.

VL 73

London, British Library, MS Add. 30846

Lectionary (Liber misticus).

Copied in the tenth or eleventh century, possibly in Silos. Visigothic minuscule script.

175 folios (28½x22 cm). Sometimes one, sometimes two columns of 22–4 lines. Parchment; black, red, and green ink, with additional colours in some decorated capitals.

The New Testament readings are from the Gospels, Acts, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Ephesians, Philippians, Hebrews, and Revelation. The text corresponds to the younger Liber comicus tradition.

Edition: Janini 1977 (partial). Cited in Vetus Latina (usually as τ‎73). Fischer Wo: 76.8 per cent (based on three passages in Luke and John).

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Fröhlich 1995:148–9; Haelewyck 2013:15; Gryson 2000–3:50.

VL 74

Sinai, St. Catherine’s Monastery, Arab. 455, foll. 1 and 4

Readings from Acts and Revelation.

Copied in the tenth century, either in the Near East or North Africa.

2 folios (19x13½ cm). One column of 19–20 lines (16x12 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The two leaves were bound into a twelfth-century Arabic homily manuscript. The lections are Acts 10:36–40, 13:14–16, 26–30, and Revelation 20:11–21:7, both corresponding to African Old Latin sources. The text of Revelation is very close to that in Augustine. The nomina sacra are similar to those in VL 1. A later hand has added the beginning and end of John 20:19–23 and two short canticles.

Edition: Lowe 1964a [Fischer 1986:111–35]. Cited in Vetus Latina.

Further literature: Fischer 1964 [1986:151–5]; Lowe 1965; Vezin 1993; Gryson 2000–3:11; Gros 2002.

(p.243) VL 75

  1. i) Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, grec 107

  2. ii) Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, grec 107A

  3. iii) Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, grec 107B

Codex Claromontanus. Pauline Epistles.

Copied around the middle of the fifth century, probably in southern Italy. Uncial (b-d) script.

533 folios (25x19 cm). A Greek–Latin bilingual manuscript, with the Greek on the verso and the Latin on the recto. One column of 21 lines (15x14 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

i) contains the majority of the manuscript; ii) consists of 35 leaves stolen in the sixteenth century and catalogued as a separate manuscript on their return, covering (in Latin) 1 Corinthians 11:23–12:5, 15:22–30, 15:44–54; 2 Corinthians 4:15–5:4; Colossians 1:16–2:12; Philippians 1:28–2:7; 1 Thessalonians 3:6–13; 2 Timothy 4:17–Titus 3:15; iii) is two replacement leaves written on a palimpsested text of Euripides in the sixth century containing the Greek text of 1 Corinthians 14:9–17. The Latin of 1 Corinthians 14:9–17 and Hebrews 13:22–25 is missing. The first three lines of each book are in red, as are indented quotations from the Old Testament. Between Philemon and Hebrews, the manuscript also contains the Catalogus Claromontanus in a later hand on four leaves which may have been left blank for the entry of Laodiceans. The text is characteristic of the bilingual tradition (text-type D), with some influence from the Greek. VL 76 and VL 83 both derive from VL 75.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b84683111> and <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10515443k>; also <http://ntvmr.uni-muenster.de/en_GB/manuscript-workspace/?docID=20006> (GA 06). (CLA V 521).

Editions: Tischendorf 1852. Cited in Sabatier (Reg. sen. Clarom. or just Reg.), Vetus Latina. and Oxford Vulgate (d).

Further literature: Corssen 1887–9; Schäfer 1929; Vogels 1933; Schäfer 1935; Zimmermann 1960; Tinnefeld 1963; Frede 1964; Nellessen 1965; Frede 1974; Schlossnikel 1991; Fröhlich 1995:25–7. TM 65887; GA 06.

VL 76

St. Petersburg, National Library of Russia, F.v. XX

Codex Sangermanensis. Pauline Epistles.

Copied in the ninth century, possibly in France. Uncial script.

174 folios (35½x27½ cm). A Greek–Latin bilingual manuscript. Two columns of 31 lines (27½x22½ cm). The Greek is in the left column and the Latin on the right. Parchment; black ink.

Fourteen folios are missing, containing the Latin text of Romans 8:21–33 and 11:15–25, and Hebrews 12:8–13:25. 1 Timothy 1:1–6:15 is supplied from the Vulgate on two replacement leaves from the late twelfth century. (p.244) The exemplar for the manuscript was VL 75, which was already missing 1 Corinthians 14:8–18: this was supplied from another Old Latin source. The Catalogus Claromontanus was also copied. Various corrections from VL 75 are incorporated (some erroneously), and there are occasional adjustments towards the Vulgate. VL 76 may have been the exemplar for VL 83.

Images: <http://ntvmr.uni-muenster.de/manuscript-workspace/?docID=20319> (GA 0319).

Editions: Belsheim 1885. Cited in Sabatier (Sangerm.), Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate (e).

Further literature: Frede 1964:34–49; Fröhlich 1995:28–9. GA 0319.

VL 77

Dresden, Sächsische Landesbibliothek, A. 145b

Codex Boernerianus. Pauline Epistles (without Hebrews).

Copied in St Gall in 860/70. Insular minuscule script.

111 folios (25x19 cm). One column of 20–6 lines (17½x13 cm). A Greek–Latin bilingual manuscript. Parchment; black ink with red and yellow rubrication.

This is a companion manuscript to VL 27. The Greek text of the Epistles is close to that of VL 75, but the interlinear Latin version reproduces the grammar of the Greek and appears to have been influenced by the Vulgate. Multiple alternative renderings are supplied for certain Greek words, and there are numerous marginal notes relating to biblical parallels, grammatical notes, and theological controversies. The following portions are missing: Romans 1:1–5, 2:16–25, 16:25–27; 1 Corinthians 3:8–16, 6:7–14; Colossians 1:1–8; Philemon 21–25. After a blank space for the conclusion of Philemon, the title for Laodiceans is present in Greek and Latin, but the last eleven pages of the manuscript were later filled with a Latin commentary on Matthew (Otfrid of Weissenburg). The manuscript suffered water damage in 1945.

Images: <http://digital.slub-dresden.de/id274591448>; also <http://ntvmr.uni-muenster.de/en_GB/manuscript-workspace/?docID=20012> (GA 012). Reichardt 1909 is a monochrome facsimile which predates the water damage.

Editions: Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate (g).

Further literature: Rönsch 1882–3; Frede 1964; Frede 1974; Bischoff 1981: 45–47; Duft 1990; Fröhlich 1995:29–31; Radiciotti 1998. GA 012.

VL 78

Cambridge, Trinity College, B.17.1

Codex Augiensis. Pauline Epistles.

Copied in Reichenau in the last third of the ninth century. Caroline minuscule script.

136 folios (23x18½ cm). A Greek–Latin bilingual manuscript. Two columns of 28 lines (18x14 cm). The Greek is in the inner column and the Latin on the outer column of each page. Parchment; black ink with red initials.

(p.245) The Greek column occupies approximately two-thirds of the width of each page and derives from the same source as VL 77. The Latin corresponds largely to the Vulgate. Romans 1:1–3:19 is missing. There is no Greek text for Hebrews, for which the Latin occupies both columns.

Images: <http://www.stgallplan.org/stgallmss/viewItem.do?ark=p21198-zz0027scpz>. Also <http://ntvmr.uni-muenster.de/en_GB/manuscript-workspace/?docID=20010> (GA 010).

Editions: Scrivener 1859. Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate (f).

Further literature: Frede 1964; Frede 1974; Fröhlich 1995:31–3; Berschin 2007.

VL 79

Wolfenbüttel, Herzog-August-Bibliothek, Weißenburg 64, foll. 255–6, 277, 280

Codex Carolinus. Portions of Romans.

Copied in North Italy at the beginning of the sixth century; palimpsested in North Italy in the eighth century. Uncial script.

Four pages (2 bifolia; cut to 26½x21½ cm). A Gothic–Latin bilingual manuscript. Two columns of 27 lines (23x18½ cm). The Gothic is in the left column and the Latin in the right. Parchment; black ink.

The extant text is Romans 11:33–12:5, 12:17–13:5, 14:9–20, 15:3–13. It corresponds to an Italian Old Latin type, with some influence from the Gothic. There are Euthalian section numbers in the margin of the Gothic.

Images: <http://diglib.hab.de/edoc/ed000006/>; <http://diglib.hab.de/mss/64-weiss/start.htm>. Henning 1913. (CLA IX 1388, cf. 1386).

Editions: Tischendorf 1861:155–8; Dold 1950; <http://diglib.hab.de/edoc/ed000006/index.php?transcript=palimpsest_Ulfilas_Falluomini> (Falluomini 2007). Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate (gue).

Further literature: Streitberg 1910; van den Hout 1951; Butzmann 1964:204–10; Henss 1973; Dahl 1979; Gryson 1990; Falluomini 1999, 2015:27, 36–8. TM 67527.

VL 80

Heidelberg, Universitätsbibliothek, Heid. HS 1334

A fragment of Romans.

Copied in the seventh century, probably in Italy. Uncial script.

Part of one page (14½x19½ cm; original page size 30x22 cm). Two columns of 25 lines (around 24x17 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The fragment contains Romans 5:14–17, 5:19–20, 6:1–2, with a text similar to that of VL 64. It was re-used in a binding.

Images: (CLA VIII 1223).

Editions: Sillib 1906. Cited in Oxford Vulgate (p).

Further literature: Frede 1964:117–20. TM 67357.

VL 81

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 653, foll. 289v–292v

A fragment of Hebrews in a copy of Pelagius.

(p.246) Copied around 800, possibly in Monza. Early minuscule script.

4 folios from a total of 292 (27x18 cm). One column of 23 lines (22x13½ cm). Parchment; black ink with one rubricated initial.

The text of Hebrews 1:1–4:3 follows the end of Pelagius’ Commentary on Philemon at the end of the manuscript. The text is Vulgate with some Old Latin readings.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8492141f>. (CLA V 527).

Editions: Souter 1924. Cited in Vetus Latina and Oxford Vulgate (v).

Further literature: Schäfer 1929; Frede 1974; Frede 1983–91. TM 66656.

VL 82

Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 29270/6 (formerly Clm 29055a)

A fragment of Hebrews.

Copied at the beginning of the ninth century, probably in Germany. South-east German minuscule script.

2 folios (1 bifolium; originally 23x15 cm). One column of 21 lines (18½x11½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

The fragment contains Hebrews 7:8–26 and 10:23–39. The text is an Old Latin form probably of North Italian origin, with some influence from Greek.

Images: <http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/bsb00001708/images/>.

Editions: Bischoff 1946:434–6. Cited in Vetus Latina.

Further literature: Fischer 1965 [1985:186]; Frede 1983–91:1037–47.

VL 83

  1. i) formerly Mengeringhausen (Waldeck), Stiftsarchiv, s.n.

  2. ii) Marburg, Hessisches Staatsarchiv, Best. 147

Codex Waldeccensis. Fragments of the Pauline Epistles.

Copied in the second half of the tenth century possibly in Corvey or Fulda. Minuscule script.

8 folios (37x22 cm). A Greek–Latin bilingual manuscript. One column of 42 lines (27x13½ cm). The Greek is on the verso and the Latin on the recto. Parchment; black ink.

i) contains Ephesians 1:5–13 and 2:3–11 in Latin and is currently lost; ii) contains 2 Corinthians 11:33–12:14 and Titus 1:1–3:3 in Latin. The manuscript incorporates the corrections of VL 75 and may have been copied directly from this or VL 76.

Images: <http://ntvmr.uni-muenster.de/manuscript-workspace/?docID=20320> (GA 0320); Bredehorn 1999 (for ii).

Edition: Schultze 1904 (for i); Bredehorn 1999 (for i and ii).

Further literature: Frede 1964:47–8; Frede 1974:76–7; Frede 1986. GA 0320.

VL 84

Vatican City, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Regin. lat. 9, foll. 2–3

(p.247) A list of lections quoting Pauline verses.

Copied in North Italy around 750. Uncial script.

2 folios (28x22 cm). Two columns of 30 lines (24½x18 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

This list stands at the front of a Vulgate manuscript of the Pauline Epistles, giving the opening words of readings for particular feasts. The text quoted is Vulgate, but with occasional Italian Old Latin readings. The sequence of readings may be related to Codex Fuldensis (Vg F).

Images: <http://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Reg.lat.9> (CLA I 100).

Editions: Dold 1944. Cited in Vetus Latina. The text of the Epistles is given under the siglum R in the Stuttgart and Oxford Vulgates; see VgSp R below.

Further literature: Fischer 1963b [1985:63–4]; Fröhlich 1995:33–4. TM 66195.

VL 85

Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, P.S.I. 13.1306

A fragment of Ephesians.

Copied in the fourth or fifth century, probably in Egypt. Rustic capital script.

One strip (3x13 cm). A Greek–Latin bilingual, with Greek on the verso and Latin on the recto. Only four lines are extant on each side. The page has been reconstructed by Dahl as one column of 19–24 lines (c. 16x13 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The Latin text is Ephesians 6:5–6.

Images: <http://www.psi-online.it/documents/psi;13;1306>; Mercati 1953a (CLA S 1694).

Editions: Mercati 1953a; Dahl 1979. Cited in Vetus Latina.

Further literature: Mercati 1953a; Dahl 1979. TM 61867; GA 0230.

VL 86

Monza, Biblioteca Capitolare, i-2/9

Fragments of the Pauline Epistles.

Copied in North Italy (Monza or around Milan) in the middle of the ninth century. Italian minuscule script.

55 folios (26x19 cm). One column of 26 lines (21½x15½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

This damaged manuscript is the remains of the second volume of a two-volume Bible. The extant leaves contain portions of Tobit, Esther and Judith, and the Pauline Epistles: Romans 1:1–10:2, 10:6, 12:13–16, 13:8–10, 14:8–10, 14:23 (followed by 16:24–25), 15:11–16:24; 1 Corinthians 1:1–5; Ephesians 4:1–2; Timothy 4:1. The list before Romans indicates that the manuscript originally contained 3 Corinthians. The text is an Old Latin form similar to that used by Ambrose. The capitula are KA S.

Editions: Frede 1964:181–286. Cited in Vetus Latina.

Further literature: Berger 1893:139–40, 395; Frede 1976a; Fischer 1965 [1985:195]; Fröhlich 1995:34–5.

(p.248) VL 87

Sélestat, Bibliothèque Humaniste, 1B

Fragments from a Pauline lectionary.

Copied in the second half of the eighth century, probably in Italy. Late uncial script.

8 folios (18½x12 cm). One column of 24 lines (15x9–10 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

The following passages are preserved: Romans 11:30–36, 12:1–16; 1 Corinthians 10:17–31; 2 Corinthians 6:2–10, 6:12–18, 10:7–14; Galatians 3:24–4:7; Ephesians 5:20–33; Philippians 3:17–21, 4:4–9; Colossians 1:23–29; 1 Thessalonians 2:19–3:13; 2 Thessalonians 3:6–8. The text is predominantly Vulgate with a few Old Latin readings. The lectionary was previously bound with VL 57. The manuscript also contains a fragment of a medical text.

Images: <http://bhnumerique.ville-selestat.fr/bhnum/player/index.html?id=MS01B&v=21&p=1>.6 (CLA VI 831).

Editions: Morin 1908; Morin 1913. Cited in Vetus Latina.

Further literature: Fröhlich 1995:35–6. TM 67611.

VL 88

Basle, Universitätsbibliothek, B.I.6

Part of a Latin Bible with Prophets and New Testament (parc).

Copied in western Germany in the ninth or tenth century. Caroline minuscule.

153 folios (48x34 cm). One column of 38–40 lines (39x25 cm); some replacement leaves have two columns. Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

Paul begins on fol. 1r, Acts on fol. 37r, Revelation on fol. 49r, Catholic Epistles on fol. 54v. From fol. 60r (62) onwards are the Major and Minor Prophets. The text throughout is Vulgate apart from folio 21 (2 Corinthians 7:3–10:18) which has an Old Latin affiliation matching VL 64 and Augustine.

Edition: Meyer 1965.

Further literature: Berger 1893:76, 130, 376; Meyer & Burckhardt 1960:10–29; Frede 1964:119–20.

VL 89

Budapest, National Széchényi Library, Cod. Lat. 1

Anonymous commentary on Paul (AN Paul).

Copied in Saint-Amand around 800. Caroline minuscule.

106 folios (32½x17 cm). One column of 29 lines (26x12 cm). Parchment; black and red ink. One multicolour full-page illustration.

The entire text of the Pauline Epistles alternates with paragraphs of commentary. The commentary appears to have been composed in Rome at the end of the fourth century. The biblical text is an Old Latin form similar in most (p.249) letters to VL 75 but without the secondary Greek influence of the bilingual tradition. In Hebrews the text is a Roman pre-Vulgate form comparable to VL 109. This manuscript is the principal witness to the capitula KA S (from 1 Corinthians to 2 Thessalonians), which are given Greek numerals.

Editions: Frede 1974 (which expands the commentary based on other sources). Cited in Vetus Latina.

Further literature: Lehmann 1939; Frede 1974; De Bruyn 1992; Dunphy 2013; Dunphy 2014; MacLachlan 2014; Dunphy 2015. TM 68774.

VL 90

This siglum has not been assigned.

VL 91, VL 133

León, Biblioteca de la Real Colegiata de San Isidoro, 2

Codex Gothicus Legionensis or Codex Biblicus Legionensis. Bible with Old and New Testament (epcar, including Laodiceans). The number VL 91 refers to the marginal glosses, while VL 133 is assigned to the Old Latin forms of certain Old Testament books.

Copied by the priest Sancho in 960, probably in León or Valeránica. Visigothic minuscule script.

517 folios (47x34½ cm). Two columns of 51 lines (33x26 cm). Parchment; black and red ink with multicolour illustrations.

This is the earliest surviving representative of the Spanish edition of the Bible with marginal glosses giving alternative readings in the Old Testament and Catholic Epistles. The text of all books is Vulgate, broken up by numerous images. Outside the Gospels, the New Testament text is unusually pure for a Spanish pandect, and may have links with southern Gaul. The Priscillian apparatus is found for the Pauline Epistles. VL 92 is a copy and VL 93 a collation of this manuscript.

Images: González 1997 (facsimile); <http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/buch/764> (selection with 160 images).

Edition: Vetus Latina (sometimes with the siglum Λ‎L) and Stuttgart Vulgate (Λ‎; not Gospels). Fischer Sl: 96.2 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:18–19, 384–5; Fischer 1961; Fischer 1963b [1985:72, 75]; Ayuso Marazuela 1960–1, 1965; González 1999 (=Dodd 1999); Gryson 2000–3:28; Schenker 2013.

VL 92

León, Biblioteca de la Real Colegiata de San Isidoro, 1.3

Three-volume Bible with Old and New Testament (epcar).

Copied in León in 1162. Visigothic minuscule script.

The volumes are of differing sizes: the New Testament is in the third volume (242 folios, 51½x35 cm). Two columns of 40–41 lines. Parchment.

This is a copy of VL 91 with some corrections towards the Vulgate.

Further literature: Berger 1893:21, 385; Fischer 1963b [1985:73]; Schenker 2013.

(p.250) VL 93

Vatican City, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Vat. lat. 4859

Collation of some Old Testament books in a printed Vulgate of 1522.

A collation of certain books and marginal glosses in VL 91 made by Bishop Francisco Trujillo in preparation for the Sixtine Vulgate. It appears not to contain any New Testament material and is not cited in the Vetus Latina edition.

VL 94

El Escorial, Biblioteca de San Lorenzo, 54.V.35

Collation of biblical glosses in a printed Vulgate of 1478.

This collation appears to have been made in 1561 from two manuscripts now lost: an eighth-century Gospel book from Oviedo Cathedral and the tenth-century Valvanera Bible. The latter contained a different selection of glosses to VL 91 from the exemplar for this type of Bible. In the New Testament, glosses are found in the margins of 1 and 2 Peter, 1 John and Jude.

Edition: Vetus Latina (Catholic Epistles). Fischer allocated it the siglum Se but did not collate it.

Further literature: Fischer 1963b [1985:73]; Schenker 2013.

VL 95

Madrid, Real Academia de la Historia, 2–3

Two volume Bible, with the Old and New Testaments (eapcr).

Copied in San Millán de la Cogolla in the twelfth century. Gothic book script.

362 and 351 folios (49x35 cm). Two columns of 40 lines. Parchment; black ink with blue and red initials.

A Spanish Bible with marginal glosses: in the New Testament (Cod. 3), these are found in 1 and 2 Peter, 1 and 3 John, and Jude. They may derive from the lost Valvanera Bible rather than the VL 91 strand. Revelation is preceded by capitula (KA A).

Images: <http://bibliotecadigital.rah.es/dgbrah/es/catalogo_imagenes/grupo.cmd?path=1000088>.

Edition: Cited in Vetus Latina (sometimes with the siglum Λ‎H). Fischer Sh: 94.6 per cent.

Further literature: Fischer 1963b [1985:73]; Gryson 2000–3:28; Schenker 2013.

VL 96

Calahorra, Archivo Catedralicio, 2

Part of a two-volume Bible.

Copied in Calahorra in 1183. 173 folios (55x37 cm). Two columns of 50 lines.

This is a copy of a manuscript similar to VL 95, preserving some of the marginal glosses. Only the first volume, containing part of the Old Testament, is preserved.

(p.251) VL 109

Madrid, Biblioteca de la Universidad Complutense, 31

Codex Complutensis primus, First Bible of Alcala. Old and New Testaments, including Laodiceans (epcar).

Copied in Spain in 927. Visigothic script.

339 folios (49½x36 cm). Three columns of 64–7 lines. Parchment; black and red ink. The canon tables have zoomorphic arches and coloured decoration.

This manuscript was partially destroyed in the Spanish Civil War, but is completely preserved in a set of photographs made in 1914. Its sources go back at least to the seventh century. Parts of the Old Testament are Old Latin. In the New Testament the overall affiliation is Vulgate but there are also Old Latin elements: traces of an Italian mixed text are found in the Pauline Epistles (the text of Hebrews has similarities with VL 89) and there are alternative readings in the margins of the Catholic Epistles with Old Latin forms. There are prefaces and capitula for the Gospels (KA B) and, preceding Romans, for the fourteen Pauline Epistles. Revelation has a unique series of capitula (KA Compl). The New Testament starts on fol. 276r with Nouum opus, Plures fuisse, and canon tables (no divisions). Laodiceans appears after Hebrews.

Images: <http://alfama.sim.ucm.es/dioscorides/consulta_libro.asp?ref=B20833532> (current state of manuscript). Image 11 in the present volume.

Editions: Fischer Sx: 89 per cent. Often cited in Vetus Latina as X.

Further literature: Berger 1893:22–3, 392; Revilla Rico 1917; Miquélez & Martínez 1935; Fischer 1963b [1985:72, 77].

VL 135

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, E. 26 inf.

The Bobbio Bible. Part of a two-volume Bible including the Pauline Epistles.

Copied in North Italy in the second quarter of the ninth century. Caroline minuscule script.

307 folios (44½x30 cm). Two columns of 42–4 lines (36½x25 cm). Parchment.

The biblical books are ordered according to the Roman Liturgy; Tobit, the beginning of Esther, and 2 Maccabees are Old Latin, as are the last two chapters of Romans. There are Old Latin readings throughout the Epistles, with similarities to VL 61 and 86. The original manuscript breaks off at Hebrews 8:11; there are supplementary leaves with six New Testament lections from the ninth or tenth century.

Editions: Cited occasionally in Vetus Latina as Γ‎B.

Further literature: Berger 1893:138–9, 394; Fischer 1963b [1985:53–4]; Frede 1964:144–9; Fischer 1965 [1985:196–7]; Fröhlich 1995:71–2; Eymann 1996:36–7.

VL 189

See C in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

(p.252) VL 251

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 9427

Lectionarium Luxoviense. Gallican Lectionary.

Copied in Luxeuil around 700. Luxeuil minuscule script.

246 folios (29x18 cm). One column of 22 lines (21½x12½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink. There are occasional coloured and zoomorphic initials.

There are 56 Old Testament readings and 131 New Testament readings. The text of all is Vulgate; three of the Easter Vigil canticles are Old Latin.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b84516388>. (CLA V 579).

Editions: Salmon 1944. Cited in the Stuttgart Vulgate only in the Catholic Epistles (L). Also cited in Sabatier (Luxoviense). Fischer Gl: 87.8 per cent (ranging from 78 per cent in Matthew14 to 90.6 per cent in Luke34).

Further literature: Salmon 1941; Salmon 1944, 1953; Thiele 1965:140–2; Fröhlich 1995:37–9; Gryson 2000–3:12–14; Tewes 2011:158–68. TM 66710. CLLA 255.

VL 259

London, British Library, MS Add. 30844

Missale Silense. Lectionary (Liber Misticus).

Copied in northern Spain (Silos?) in the eleventh century. Visigothic minuscule script.

172 folios (40x32 cm). Two columns of 22–4 lines. Parchment; black, red, and blue ink. Numerous colourful decorated initials.

In addition, folios 173–7 are from a tenth-century Liber canticorum, with two columns of 27 lines, containing canticles from Isaiah and Luke.

The text of the missal is Vulgate with variants typical of the Mozarabic lectionary.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_30844>.

Editions: Janini 1976; Fischer Wm: 88.3 per cent.

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Gryson 2000–3:14; CLLA 305.

VL 262

Toledo, Catedral, Biblioteca del Cabildo, 35-5

Liber misticus. Lectionary.

Copied in Toledo in the thirteenth century. Visigothic minuscule script.

204 folios (30½x25 cm). Two columns of 22–6 lines. Parchment; black ink.

This is a representative of the liturgical tradition found in the Mozarabic Missal. Some pages are missing.

Editions: Janini 1980 (partial); Fischer Wd: 76.9 per cent (ranging from 58.1 per cent in Matthew14 to 89.7 per cent in John42).

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Mundó 1965; Janini et al 1977; Fröhlich 1995:39–41; Gryson 2000–3:14; CLLA 312.

VL 271

Toledo, Catedral, Biblioteca del Cabildo, 35-6

Liber misticus. Lectionary.

Copied in Toledo around 1000. Visigothic minuscule script.

(p.253) 199 folios (31x20 cm). One column of 23 lines (23x13½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink. Coloured initials.

The text is similar to the other Mozarabic lectionaries (VL 56, 69, and 70) but with additional Old Latin readings especially in 1 Peter and Revelation.

Edition: Fischer Wb: 79.6 per cent.

Further literature: Férotin 1912; Millares Carlo 1963; Janini et al. 1977; Fröhlich 1995:41; Gryson 2000–3:14–15; Haelewyck 2013:15; CLLA 313.

VL 330

Vatican, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Reg. lat. 11

The Queen’s Psalter. Double Psalter with Canticles.

Copied in northern France in the second half of the eighth century. Uncial script.

The canticles include Revelation 15:3–4 in an Old Latin form.

Images: <http://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Reg.lat.11>. (CLA I 101).

Edition: Cited in Vetus Latina (Apocalypse).

Further literature: Morin 1909; Gryson 2000–3:15. TM 66196.

VL 411

London, British Library, MS Add. 30851

Liturgical manuscript, including Psalter and Canticles.

Copied in Spain (probably Silos) in the tenth or eleventh century. Visigothic minuscule script.

202 folios (39x30 cm). Two columns of 25 lines (28x8 cm per column). Parchment; black ink with rubrication and coloured initials.

The manuscript consists of a Mozarabic Psalter, Mozarabic Canticles, a Book of Hymns, and an Office with hymns and antiphons. Among the last of these there is a brief lection from 1 Corinthians 16:13–14 and 2 Corinthians 13:11 on fol. 172v also found in VL 414 and 415.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_30851_fs001r>.

Edition: Gilson 1905; see also Fröhlich 1995:42.

Further literature: Porter 1935; Schneider 1938:126–158; Millares Carlo 1963; Díaz y Díaz 1988. CLLA 352.

VL 414

Santiago de Compostela, Biblioteca de la Universidad, 5

Book of Hours of Ferdinand I, including Psalter and Canticles.

Copied in northern Spain in 1055 by the copyist Petrus. Visigothic minuscule script.

226 folios (31x20 cm). One column of 22–3 lines (22x11 cm). Parchment; black ink with much decoration.

The 102 canticles include 24 only found in this manuscript and VL 415; two are from Revelation. The Office features the Corinthian liturgical sentence also in VL 411.

Edition: Cited occasionally in Vetus Latina; see also Fröhlich 1995:42.

(p.254) Further literature: Férotin 1901; Fröhlich 1995:43–4; Gryson 2000–3:16. CLLA 356.

VL 415

Salamanca, Biblioteca de la Universidad, 2268

Book of Hours, including Canticles.

Copied in northern Spain in 1059 by the copyist Christoforus. Visigothic minuscule script.

187 folios (21½x13 cm). One column of 14–15 lines. Parchment; black ink.

This includes the same collection of Canticles as VL 414 with two additions. The order is slightly different, but the text is almost identical to VL 414. The Corinthian liturgical sentence of VL 411 is also present.

Edition: Cited occasionally in Vetus Latina; see also Fröhlich 1995:42.

Further literature: Férotin 1901; Fröhlich 1995:44; Gryson 2000–3:16. CLLA 358.

Addendum

Graz, Universitätsbibliothek, 1703–53

Fragments of a lectionary with an Old Latin lection in Acts.

Copied in the twelfth century.

Two parts of one folio (originally 35x30 cm, with one column of 34 lines). Parchment; black and red ink.

The lectionary comprises three passages from Acts: the first (4:9–22) is Old Latin, similar to VL 51 and Lucifer of Cagliari; the others (14:8–28 and 15:1–14) are Vulgate but with Old Latin readings.

Images: <http://sosa2.uni-graz.at/sosa/katalog/katalogisate/1703/1703-0053.html>.

Edition: Simonet 2010.

B) Manuscripts in the Stuttgart Vulgate

These are given in the order in which they are listed in the Stuttgart Vulgate, consisting of Roman capital letters (A–Z), Greek capital letters (Λ–Φ‎V), and Roman lower case letters (k–s). The siglum in square brackets is explained above in the Preface. All Gospels are in the order Matthew, Mark, Luke, John.

A [Vg A]

Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Amiatino 1

Codex Amiatinus. Bible containing Old and New Testaments (eapcr).

Copied in Northumbria at the beginning of the eighth century. Uncial script.

1030 folios (50½x34 cm). Two columns of 44–5 lines (36–7½x26 cm). Parchment; black and red ink with coloured illuminations in the prefatory material.

(p.255) The format may have been modelled on Cassiodorus’ codex grandior, while the text comes from a variety of sources. The gospels (and their capitula, KA C) were copied from a Neapolitan gospel book; the Pauline text is also a good Italian Vulgate. The capitula to Acts (KA Act C) and the Catholic Epistles (apart from James and 1 Peter) are otherwise unattested, and the text of these books displays similarities with Spanish and Insular manuscripts respectively.

Images: Ricci 2000 (CD facsimile), Bibbia Amiatina 2003 (reduced facsimile). (CLA III 299). Image 9 in the present volume.

Editions: Tischendorf 1850. Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (A) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (A). Fischer Na: 97.3 per cent.

Further literature: Wright 1961; Fischer 1962 [1985:9–34]; Fischer 1963b [1985:67–9]; Bruce Mitford 1969; Fischer 1972:57–60 [1986:230–3]; Alexander 1978; Corsano 1987; Petitmengin 1990a; Meyvaert 1996; Gorman 2003a (useful on earlier studies); Bogaert 2012:75–6; O’Loughlin 2014. TM 66398.

C [Vg C]

Cava de’ Tirreni (Salerno), Archivio della Badia MS 1 (14)

Codex Cavensis or Biblia de Danila. Bible containing Old and New Testaments (epcar, including Laodiceans).

Copied in Spain in the ninth century by the scribe Danila. Visigothic minuscule script.

303 folios (32x27 cm). Three columns of 54–56 lines (27x21½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink. Decorations in blue, yellow, and green, but no illustrations apart from crosses. Five folios are stained blue or purple, with text in coloured ink and sometimes a cross shape, including Jerome’s Preface to the Gospels.

The text is typical of the Spanish Vulgate apart from the Old Latin version of Baruch. The manuscript appears to be a copy of a pandect from the beginning of the seventh century: it may be as early as 810 although it is normally dated after 850. There are occasional Old Latin readings throughout the New Testament. For the Pauline Epistles, the manuscript reproduces the edition of Peregrinus. Capitula, Eusebian apparatus and other reference systems are all present. Vatican, Vat. lat. 8484 is a copy of this manuscript made for Mai in 1831.

Editions: Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (C) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (C or VL 189). Fischer Sc: 96.4 per cent.

Further literature: Ziegler 1876b; Berger 1893:14–15, 379; Lowe 1937; Ayuso Marazuela 1955–6; Millares Carlo 1963; Fischer 1963b [1985:78–79]; Fröhlich 1995:47–49; Bogaert 2012:81; Cherubini 2012; Perriccioli Saggese 2014.

D [VgS D]7

Dublin, Trinity College, MS 57

Book of Durrow or Codex Durmachensis. Four Gospels.

(p.256) Copied in the second half of the seventh century, probably in Northumbria. Insular minuscule script.

248 folios (24½x14½ cm). One column of 25 lines (21x12 cm), apart from capitula in two columns. Parchment; black ink. There are decorated initials, carpet pages and full-page evangelist symbols before each gospel; there is also a single four-symbols page.

The prefatory material consists of Nouum opus and canon tables. Each gospel has its own capitula (KA I); there are lists of Hebrew names for Matthew and John. The text is a good representative of the Vulgate. The evangelist symbols have the earlier arrangement of a lion for John and an eagle for Mark.

Images: Luce et al. 1960 (facsimile). (CLA II 273).

Collation: Fischer Ed: 93.9 per cent.

Further literature: Nordenfalk 1947; Powell 1956; McGurk 1961a no. 86; Fischer 1972:57 [1986:230]; McGurk 1994b; O’Sullivan 1994; Meehan 1996. TM 66359.

F [Vg F]

Fulda, Hochschul- und Landesbibliothek, Bonifatianus 1

Codex Fuldensis or Victor Codex. Harmony of the Gospels followed by the rest of the New Testament, including Laodiceans (epacr).

Copied in Capua in 546. Uncial script.

503 folios (29x14 cm). One column of 35 lines (19x6–7 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

This is the earliest surviving Latin pandect of the New Testament. The gospel harmony is preceded by canon tables; indications of the source gospel appear in the text and margin. There are also source marks in the epistles. The entire manuscript was corrected by Victor himself in 546–7: in Paul, his corrections have a very similar text to that of VgSp R. Later corrections and glosses in Insular uncial and Insular minuscule scripts derive from the period when the manuscript belonged to St Boniface. All books have prologues and capitula, although those of Acts are on a separate quire inserted in the scriptorium after the initial completion of the manuscript in April 546. The affiliation of the capitula is as follows: KA Act A; AN conc; KA Rm Ant, followed by KA Rm A; KA 1Cor A, etc.; KA Iac A, KA 1Pt A, etc., KA Apc B.

Images: <http://fuldig.hs-fulda.de/viewer/image/PPN325289808/1/>. (CLA VIII 1196). Image 7 in the present volume.

Editions: Ranke 1868 (with corrigenda). Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (F) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (F). Fischer Jf: 83.5 per cent (ranging from 52.5 per cent in Mark24 to 98.6 per cent in John41; the harmony poses challenges of classification). A new edition and English translation is being prepared by Nicholas Zola.

Further literature: Chapman 1908: 78–161 (but see Fischer 1972:39 [1986:207]); McGurk 1955; Bolgiani 1962; Fischer 1963b:545–57 [1985:57–66]; (p.257) Bischoff 1990:93; Petersen 1994; Schmid 2003b, 2005; Scherbenske 2010; Schmid 2012:119–20. TM 67337.

G [Vg G]

See VL 7 above.

I [VgS I]

Rome, Biblioteca Vallicelliana B.25II

Codex Iuvenianus, Codex Vallicellianus. Acts, Catholic Epistles and Revelation.

Copied in the eighth or ninth century, possibly in Rome, by the subdeacon Juvenianus. Uncial script.

101 folios (31x23 cm). One column of 30 lines (24x17½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink. Decorated and zoomorphic initials in multiple colours. Three full-page illustrations.

The overall affiliation is with the Vulgate, but there are a handful of earlier and unusual readings. The biblical text is followed by the first book of Bede’s Commentary on Revelation. The capitula for Acts are KA In, for Revelation KA A.

Images: (CLA IV 430).

Editions: Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (I) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (I).

Further literature: Messerer 1961; Fischer 1965 [1985:200]; Mütherich 1976; Schmid 1992. TM 66536.

K [VgS K]

Karlsruhe, Badische Landesbibliothek, Aug. perg. 185

Pauline and Catholic Epistles.

Copied in Reichenau in the ninth century.

88 folios (26½x17 cm). One column of 27 lines. Parchment; black ink.

The text is a good Italian Vulgate, close to Vg A. There are prologues to each Epistle.

Images: <http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:31-45394>, <http://digital.blb-karlsruhe.de/blbhs/content/pageview/2290274>

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (K).

Further literature: Frede 1976b.

L [VgS L]

See VL 251 above.

M [VgS M]8

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, C. 39 inf.

Codex Mediolanensis. Four Gospels.

Copied in North Italy in the second half of the sixth century. Uncial script.

(p.258) 281 folios (27x17 cm). One column of 25 lines (18x11 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

The text is Vulgate. The first quire is missing, including Matthew 1:1–15. Other portions are replacements, including a copy of John 13–18 from the manuscript itself. Greek numerals are used for the Eusebian apparatus, which does not share the erroneous placing of Jerome’s archetype.9 There are liturgical notes in the margin from the seventh century.

Images: (CLA III 313).

Editions: Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (M). Fischer Jm: 96.9 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 95; Parker 1990. TM 66410.

N [VgS N]

  1. i) Autun, Bibliothèque municipale, 21 (foll. 64–136, 138–42, 105b)

  2. ii) Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, nouv. acq. latin 1628 (foll. 5–14)

Fragments of the four Gospels.

Copied in Italy in the fifth century. Palimpsested in Lyons in the late eighth century. Uncial script.

83 folios (originally 31x24 cm). Two columns of 22–4 lines (21½x18 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

One of the oldest Vulgate witnesses, with a mixture of Vulgate and Old Latin readings. Capitula are present on folio 10 of the Paris portion.

Images: Maître 2004 (CD-ROM; one image). (CLA VI 722).

Collation: Fischer Jn: 96.2 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 48; Fischer 1972:57 [1986:230]; Maître 2004:94–7. TM 66890.

P [VgS P]

Split, Cathedral Library, s. n.

Codex Spalatensis. Four Gospels.

Copied in Italy or possibly in Salona in the sixth or seventh century. Half-uncial script.

309 folios (23½x17½ cm).10 Two columns of 21 lines (18x13½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

The following portions are missing: Matthew 1:1–14, 4:21–8:3; Mark 15:46–16:20; John 18:12–21:25. Various Greek texts are written in transliteration, including the opening of John (fol. 246). Two exemplars seem to have been used, one for the Synoptics and one for John. Capitula are present before Mark and Luke (KA I) and John (KA Ben). There are liturgical notes in the margin.

Images: (CLA XI 1669).

Collation: Fischer Jy: 91.6 per cent.

(p.259) Further literature: Devich 1893; McGurk 1961a no. 138; Popovic 1989, 1992; McGurk 1994a:6–7. TM 67822.

R (Pauline Epistles) [VgSp R]

Vatican City, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Regin. lat. 9

Pauline Epistles.

Copied in Ravenna in the middle of the eighth century. Uncial script.

113 folios (30½x22 cm). Two columns of 29–32 lines (24½x18 cm). Parchment; black and red ink. Decorated capitals, some foliated, in red, green, and yellow.

The first two folios are a list of Pauline lections with Old Latin affiliation (VL 84; see above). The text of the Epistles is a good Vulgate, with some earlier readings at the beginning of the collection; there are some doublets. The summaries are rare and do not match the divisions of the text. There are also stichometric numbers.

Images: <http://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Reg.lat.9> (CLA I 100).

Editions: Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (R) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (R; VL 84).

Further literature: Berger 1893:85; Wilmart 1937:19–23; Dold 1944; Fischer 1963b [1985:63–4], 1965 [1985:199]. TM 66195.

R (Catholic Epistles) [VgSc R]

Verona, Biblioteca Capitolare X (8)

Catholic Epistles and patristic works.

Copied in Verona around the end of the seventh century. Uncial and half-uncial script.

158 folios (19x12 cm). One column of 22–4 lines (15x10 cm). Parchment; black and red ink. Some decorative crosses.

The patristic writings are by Augustine, Ambrose, and Leo.

Images: (CLA IV 483).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (R).

Further literature: Spagnolo & Marchi 1996:58–9. TM 66590.

S (Gospels) [VgSe S]

  1. i) St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 1395 (pp. 7–327)

  2. ii) St Gall, Kantonsbibliothek, Vadianische Sammlung Ms. 292a

  3. iii) St Paul in Kärnten, Stiftsbibliothek St Paul im Lavanttal, 25.4.21a

  4. iv) Zürich, Staatsarchiv A.G. 19, No. II (foll. 2–5)

  5. v) Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, C.43

  6. vi) Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, C.79b (foll. 4–7)

  7. vii) Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Z.XIV.5

Four Gospels (fragmentary).

Copied in Italy in the first half of the fifth century. Half-uncial script.

(p.260) 110 folios (23x18½ cm). Two columns of 23–5 lines (14½x13 cm). Parchment; black ink.

This is the oldest surviving Vulgate gospel book, which may even have been copied during Jerome’s lifetime. It was subsequently dismembered and used for bindings. The Eusebian apparatus is present in the margin; the canon number is in a different colour, but parallel passages are also given. i) has 90 leaves containing portions of Matthew 6:21–John 17:18; ii) consists of seven pages with parts of Mark 1:27–9:7. Marginal comments refer to Latin variants and Greek readings, e.g. i) pp. 95, 136, 168b, and 312. The beginnings of Mark and John indicate that there were no capitula or prefaces. A copy of this manuscript, VgSe s (see below), can be used to supply text now lacking.

Images: i) <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/1395/7/>; ii) <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/vad/0292a>; v) <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/binding/zbz/C0043/bindingF/>. (CLA VII 984; also X 984). Image 6 in the present volume.

Editions: Also cited in Tischendorf (san). Fischer Js: 98.3 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:418; Turner 1931; Lehmann 1933; Dold 1933; Dold 1941; Bischoff 1941, 1946; McGurk 1961a no. 122; Bischoff 1966:101–11; Fischer 1972:57–60 [1986:230–3]; Parkes 1992:15, 161; McGurk 1994a:6. TM 67129.

S (Acts and Revelation) [VgSar S]

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 2 (p. 301–568)

Acts, Revelation, and other works.

Copied in St Gall in 760–80 by the scribe Winithar. Alemannic minuscule script.

134 folios, numbered 301–568 (24½x15½ cm). One column of 25–8 lines (21x14 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication; some coloured initials in green, yellow, and purple.

This was originally a separate codex in its own right, but is now bound with a copy of Numbers and Deuteronomy. Acts, whose text is close to that of Vg F, begins with capitula on p. 301; it is followed by Revelation with a prologue and capitula (KA B; p. 431 ff.). VgSc S may be a partial copy of Revelation. The non-biblical portion starts with the Passion of St Clement on p. 489.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0002/301>. (CLA VII 894).

Editions: Also cited for Acts in the Oxford Vulgate (S) and in Vetus Latina (Apocalypse: S).

Further literature: Berger 1893:120–1, 413; Fischer 1965 [1985:181]; Gryson 2000–3:21. TM 67038.

S (Paul) [VgSp S]

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 70

Pauline Epistles.

Copied in St Gall in 760–80 by the scribe Winithar. Alemannic minuscule script.

(p.261) 128 folios, numbered 1–258 (29x20½ cm). One column of 27 lines (21½x16½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication. Coloured initials with some human and animal decoration.

All epistles are preceded by prologues and capitula. Hebrews comes between 2 Thessalonians and 1 Timothy. The text derives from a similar Italian source to Vg F, but was corrected towards the text of Theodulf’s edition in the early ninth century. There are stichometric numbers.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0070/>. (CLA VII 903).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (S).

Further literature: Berger 1893:117–20, 417; Fischer 1965 [1985:181–2], 1971 [1985:338]. TM 67047.

S (Catholic Epistles) [VgSc S]

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 907

Miscellany including Catholic Epistles and part of Revelation.

Copied in St Gall in 760–80 by the scribe Winithar. Alemannic minuscule script.

158 folios, numbered 1–316 (25x17½ cm). One column of 24 lines (20½x15½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

The manuscript begins with an extensive glossary. The Catholic Epistles are found on pp. 237–97; Revelation 1:1–7:2 appears on pp. 303–18, apparently copied from VgSar S. There are prefaces and chapter divisions (e.g. S 812 for 1 Peter).

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0907/>. (CLA VII 952).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (S in Catholic Epistles, s in Revelation).

Further literature: Berger 1893:121, 418; Fischer 1965 [1985:181–2]; Gryson 2000–3:22. TM 67096.

Z (Gospels) [VgS Z]

London, British Library, Harley 1775

Codex Harleianus, Harley Gospels. Four Gospels.

Copied in Italy in the sixth century. Uncial script.

469 folios (18x12 cm). One column of 25 lines (13x7½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

The text is arranged in sense lines. The gospels are preceded by Plures fuisse, the prologue to Matthew and canon tables (no divisions) in elegant coloured columns. Pages have been left blank between the preface and the beginning of each gospel for capitula. Eusebian apparatus is in the margins with parallel passages. The first two lines of the Passion narrative in Matthew are in red. The text is from an Italian edition of the Vulgate Gospels.11 This is one of the (p.262) principal witnesses in both the Oxford and the Stuttgart Vulgates: its text is closer to VgSe S than Vg A. The two correctors date from the sixth and ninth centuries; the latter adds liturgical indications in Tironian notes.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=harley_ms_1775_f002r>. (CLA II 197).

Editions: Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (Z). Fischer Jz: 96.3 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 26; Fischer 1963b [1985:54], 1971 [1985:374–7], 1972:57–60 [1986:231–3]; Popovic 1990; McGurk 1993, 1994a:19–20; Jullien 2004. TM 68772.

Λ‎ [Vg Λ‎]

See VL 91; also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (Λ‎L).

Φ‎ [VgS Φ‎]

This indicates Alcuin’s recension and represents the agreement of the following five manuscripts (Φ‎B, Φ‎E, Φ‎G, Φ‎T, Φ‎V).

Φ‎B [VgS ΦΒ‎]

Bamberg, Staatliche Bibliothek, Msc. Bibl. 1. (formerly A.I.5)

Bible: Old and New Testament (eacp).

Copied in Tours at the beginning of the ninth century. Minuscule script.

423 folios (47x35½ cm). Two columns of 49–52 lines (36½x26½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication. Decorative initials and two full-page illuminations (Genesis fol. 7v; Lamb of God fol. 339v).

The New Testament begins on fol. 334v; Revelation is missing. There are initial canon tables, and prefaces and capitula for each book (KA Pi for the Gospels, KA A for Acts, Catholic Epistles, and Revelation and a mixture of KA T, B, A, and H in Paul).

Images: <https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-sbb00000032-1>

Editions: Cited in the Stuttgart Vulgate for Acts, Pauline Epistles, and Catholic Epistles. Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (B) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (Φ‎B). Fischer Tb: 95.6 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:206–7 and 376–7 (with bibliography); Rand 1929; Fischer 1957, 1971 [1985:291–312]; Kessler 1977.

Φ‎E [VgS Φ‎E]

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 8847

Part of a pandect, including the whole New Testament (eacpr).

Copied in Tours around 800. Minuscule script.

177 folios (45x34 cm). Two columns of 40 lines (37x25–7 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

This is one of the oldest surviving pandects from the Tours scriptorium. The New Testament begins on fol. 88r; all books have prefaces, with capitula for the latter books (KA A for Acts and Revelation, a mixture of KA A and Tur (p.263) for the Catholic Epistles, and KA A and B in Paul), but not the Gospels. Fragments of the Old Testament are preserved in other manuscripts.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8438679t>.

Editions: Collation in Jones 1935:150–66 (but see Fischer 1971 [1985:329]). Cited in Stuttgart Vulgate for Philippians to 2 Timothy. Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (Φ‎E). Fischer Te: 95.8 per cent.

Further literature: Jones 1935; Fischer 1971 [1985:291–312, 326–30, 336]; Schroeder 1983; Ferrari 1999; Gryson 2000–3:34; Ganz 2012:332–3. TM 67824.

Φ‎G [VgS Φ‎G]

London, British Library, MS Add. 10546

Codex Grandivallensis, Moutier-Grandval Bible, Codex Carolinus (Bible of Charlemagne). Bible: Old and New Testaments (eacpr).

Copied in Tours in the first half of the ninth century. Caroline minuscule script.

449 folios (51x37½ cm). Two columns of 50–1 lines. Parchment; black ink with rubrication. Decorated capitals. Several richly coloured full-page illustrations.

The New Testament begins on fol. 349r. There are initial canon tables, and prefaces and capitula for each book (KA Pi for the Gospels, KA A for Acts, Catholic Epistles, Revelation, and most of Paul, with KA M for Romans and KA H for Hebrews). Twenty-four copyists worked on this volume.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_10546>; Duft et al 1971 (facsimile). Image 10 in the present volume.

Editions: Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (K) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (Φ‎G). Fischer Tg: 95.7 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:209–12, 389; Duft et al 1971; Fischer 1971 [1985:291–312]; Bruckner 1972; Kessler 1977; Ganz 1994; Gryson 2000–3:34; Ganz 2012:332–3.

Φ‎T [VgS ΦΤ‎]

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 75

Bible: Old and New Testament (eacrp).

Copied in Tours around 800. Minuscule script.

836 pages (54x39½ cm). Two columns of 50–5 lines (38–9½x27 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

This is the oldest complete pandect from Tours. The New Testament begins on p. 689. There are initial canon tables and prefaces: the latter books have capitula (KA A for Acts and Revelation, a mixture of KA A and Tur for the Catholic Epistles, and KA A and B in Paul), but there are none before the Gospels. It was in St Gall by 883.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0075/>. (CLA VII 904).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (Φ‎T). Fischer Tt: 94.3 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:127–9; Fischer 1965 [1985:126], 1971 [1985:291–312]; Fröhlich 1995:109–10; Gryson 2000–3:35; Ganz 2012:331–3. TM 67048.

(p.264) Φ‎V [VgS Φ‎V]

Rome, Biblioteca Vallicelliana, B.6

Codex Vallicellianus. Bible: Old and New Testaments (eapcr).

Copied in the region of Reims around 850. Minuscule script.

346 folios (35x30½ cm). Three columns of around 54 lines. Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

There are initial canon tables, and prefaces and capitula for each book (KA C for the Gospels, KA Tur for Acts, Catholic Epistles, and Revelation and probably a mixture of KA M, A, and B for Paul). The text of the gospels is similar to VgO MT, with a number of Insular features.

Editions: Also cited in Oxford Vulgate (V) and occasionally in Vetus Latina (Φ‎V). Fischer Cv: 95.9 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:197–203, 413; Fischer 1963b [1985:40], 1971 [1985:291–312]; Gryson 2000–3:35; Lobrichon 2004.

k (Pauline Epistles) [VgSp k]

Fragments of a Bible, including Pauline Epistles

  1. i) Orléans, Bibliothèque municipale, 19 (16), foll. 26–30

  2. ii) Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 2389, foll. 41r–8v

  3. iii) Orléans, Bibliothèque municipale, 19 (16), foll. 31–2

These fragments derive from two manuscripts: i+ii and iii. Copied in Italy in the second half of the sixth century. Uncial script.

i+ii consist of 13 folios (24x15 cm). One column of 25 lines (20x11 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

  1. i) contains 1 Thessalonians 1:1–2:14, 4:6–5:1; 1 Corinthians 9:13–23, 10:29–11:12; preceded by some Old Testament fragments.

  2. ii) contains Philippians 4:6–23; Colossians 1:1–4:7 as part of a composite codex. The two epistles are separated by hederae and the titles and preface to Colossians are written in half-uncial script.

  3. iii) consists of 1 bifolium (31½x24 cm). Two columns of 33 lines (25x20½ cm) written in sense lines. Parchment; black and red ink. The biblical coverage is Ephesians 6:6–24 and Philippians 1:1–27. The chapter divisions are similar to VL 84.

Both manuscripts originally came from Fleury.

Images: ii) <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b84323098>. (CLA VI 800, 801).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (J).

Further literature: Berger 1893:85, 397; Fischer 1972:68 [1986:244]. TM 66973, 66974.

k (James) [VgSc k]

Karlsruhe, Bayerische Landesbibliothek, Fragm. Aug. 15

(p.265) Fragment of James.

Copied in the first half of the seventh century, possibly in Italy. Uncial script.

2 folios; most of one bifolium (26x18½ cm). Two columns of 31 lines. Parchment; black ink.

The fragment contains James 2:6–4:4 with a Vulgate text.

Images: <http://digital.blb-karlsruhe.de/id/21575>. (CLA VIII 1114).

Edition: Holder 1914 <http://www.manuscripta-mediaevalia.de/hs/katalogseiten/HSK0721_c367_jpg.htm>.

Further literature: Fischer 1965 [1985:179]. TM 67254.

l [VgS l]

See VL 67 above.

r [VgS r]

Ravenna, Archivio arcivescovile, s. n.

Fragments from a New Testament (Acts, 1 John, and Revelation).

Copied in Ravenna in the second half of the sixth century. Uncial script.

6 folios (31x22½ cm). Two columns of 29 lines (24x20 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

The contents are Acts 16:11–25, 17:32–18:17, 19:6–10, 19:18–22, 21:11–26; 1 John 3:17–4:11; Revelation 6:2–15.

Images: (CLA IV 411).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (J).

Further literature: TM 66516.

s (Gospels) [VgSe s]

Fulda, Hochschul- und Landesbibliothek, Aa 11

Second volume of a two-volume Bible, containing the New Testament (eacrp).

Copied in Reichenau in the first half of the ninth century. Caroline minuscule script.

302 folios (43x30 cm). Two columns of 36–43 lines (35½x22 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

The New Testament begins on fol. 201. The gospels are a copy of VgSe S, and are used in the Stuttgart Vulgate to supply text now lacking in that witness. There are some readings from Peregrinus’ edition in the Pauline Epistles. Most books have prologues and capitula (KA B in Revelation).

Editions: Cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (σ‎R). Fischer Jr: 97.2 per cent.

Images: <http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hebis:66:fuldig-2418167>.

Further literature: Frede 1964:56ff.; Fischer 1965 [1985:179], 1971 [1985:291–302], 1972:57–8 [1986:231–2]; Gryson 2000–3:46–7.

s (Paul) [VgSp s]

St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 908

Fragments of the Pauline Epistles.

(p.266) Copied in northern Italy in the first half of the sixth century. Uncial script. Palimpsested twice, first around 700 with a Milan liturgy and again around 800 with glossaries in North Italy or Switzerland.

21 pages (originally 25x20 cm). Two columns of 24 lines (17½x16½ cm). Parchment; black ink.

The Pauline passages, with a good Italian Vulgate text, occur between pages 77 and 122 of the manuscript; a list is given on page 76 b–c. The following text is extant: Ephesians 6:20–24; Philippians 1:1–3:1, 3:15–19, 4:2–23; Colossians 1:1–3:10; 1 Thessalonians 4:16–5:18; 1 Timothy 1:9–2:5. There are also prologues to the epistles. The nomen sacrum for Christ is written XRS.

Images: <http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/0908/77>. (CLA VII 957).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (I).

Further literature: Fischer 1972:68 [1986:244]. TM 67101.

In addition, there are four manuscripts used for the Epistle to the Laodiceans (given in an Appendix on page 1976 of the Stuttgart Vulgate) which are not otherwise cited in the New Testament:

B [VgS B]

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, E. 53 inf.

Codex Abiascensis, Bible of Biasca. Partial Bible: most of the Old and New Testaments, including Laodiceans and 3 Corinthians.

Copied in Milan in the tenth century. Minuscule script.

328 folios (52x41 cm). Two columns of 49–51 lines. Parchment; black and red ink.

The manuscript is badly damaged, with the top half of each page often lacunose. Arranged according to the Roman Lectionary, the manuscript never contained the Psalter or the Gospels. All books have capitula and prefaces, apart from Acts which starts at 1:21 on fol. 97r; it is followed by the Catholic Epistles (108r–113v) and the Apocalypse (113v–18v). The Pauline Epistles are found on foll. 298–328, with much prefatory material; the apocryphal letter of the Corinthians and Paul’s response (3 Corinthians) appears at the end of the corpus after Hebrews.

Images: <http://dai.ambrosiana.eu/nav?f1stId=&resId=&s2ndId=E+53+inf.&agency=MI0133&agencyType=2> (subscription required).

Editions: Cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (Γ‎A).

Further literature: Berger 1893:143, 394; Fischer 1965 [1985:194].

D

See VL 61 above.

M [VgOp M]

See M (Pauline Epistles) in the Oxford Vulgate below.

Q [VgS Q]

Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, B. 48 sup.

(p.267) Pauline and Catholic Epistles, including Laodiceans.

Copied in Italy in the ninth century. 140 folios (20x14 cm). One column of 26 lines. Parchment; black and red ink.

The manuscript may be connected with the Irish teacher Dungal. Its text shows influence from Alcuin Bibles. The text is preceded by the prefaces of Pelagius and Isidore, the verses of Damasus, and the Priscillian Canons.

Editions: Cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (Γ‎C).

Images: <http://dai.ambrosiana.eu/nav?f1stId=&resId=&s2ndId=B+48+sup.&agency=MI0133&agencyType=2> (subscription required).

Further literature: Fischer 1971 [1985:402].

C) Manuscripts in the Oxford Vulgate

Cross-references are given to manuscripts already described for the Stuttgart Vulgate. Witnesses are listed in the following order of siglum: Roman capital letters (including double letters for BF, EP, and MT), Greek capital letters, and additional witnesses with lower-case letters. All Gospels follow the Vulgate sequence. For a full table of correspondences, see Appendix 1.

A [Vg A]

See A in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

B (Gospels) [VgOe B]

  1. i) Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 281

  2. ii) Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 298

Codex Bigotianus, Codex Fiscannensis. Four Gospels.

Copied in southern England in the last quarter of the eighth century. Uncial script, with prefatory material in rustic capitals.

216 and 49 folios (35x27 cm). One column of 21 lines (27x22 cm). Parchment; black and red ink. Large coloured initials with zoomorphic figures.

i) consists of 216 folios, containing the Synoptic Gospels; ii) consists of 49 folios, containing John. The text is written in sense lines. After Nouum opus and Plures fuisse the canon tables and certain other pages have been removed. There are prefaces and capitula (KA B).

Images: i) <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8492142v>; ii) <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9065974x>. (CLA V 526).

Collation: Fischer Eb: 95.7 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:50, 403; McGurk 1961a no. 58. TM 66655.

B (Acts, Pauline Epistles, Catholic Epistles)

See Φ‎B in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

(p.268) ВF [VgO BF]

London, British Library, MS Add. 5463

Codex Beneventanus. Four Gospels.

Copied in St Vincent on the Volturno in Benevento by the monk Lupus between 736 and 760. Uncial script.

239 folios (35½x27½ cm). Two columns of 23 lines (26½x21½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink. Coloured initials and decorative patterns in the colophons.

The text is written in sense lines. There are illuminated canon tables; one set of arches is blank. These are followed by Nouum opus and Plures fuisse. Prologues and capitula (KA B) are present before each gospel.

Images: (CLA II 162).

Collation: Fischer Jb: 96.2 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:91–2, 389; McGurk 1961a no. 18; Fischer 1965 [1985:201]. TM 66266.

C [Vg C]

See C in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

D

See VL 61 above.

E (Gospels) [VgOe E]

London, British Library, MS Egerton 609

Gospels of Marmoutier. Four Gospels.

Copied in western France, probably Brittany, in the second quarter of the ninth century. Caroline minuscule script.

102 folios (31x21 cm). One column of 28–30 lines. Parchment; black ink, with red and yellow highlights. There are evangelist portraits, coloured zoomorphic initials and decorated canon tables.

The manuscript is missing Mark 6:56 to Luke 7:24. The text is part of the Irish-Northumbrian Vulgate group. Each gospel has a preface, but no capitula.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Egerton_MS_609>.

Edition: Cited in Sabatier (Maj. Mon.); Bianchini 1749 (Mm; John–Mark); Fischer Be: 86.2 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:47, 388; Chapman 1908; Rand 1929; Morey 1931; Fischer 1972:52–6 [1986:224–8]; Alexander 1978; McGurk 1987:189; Lemoine 2004.

E (Paul) [VgOp E]

London, British Library, MS Cotton Vitellius C. VIII, foll. 86–90

Portions of some Pauline Epistles.

Copied in Northumbria in the first half of the eighth century. Insular minuscule script.

(p.269) 5 folios (29½x23 cm). One column of 27 lines (25x16½ cm). Parchment; black ink with red and yellow decoration.

This manuscript consists of five folios extracted from Cambridge, Trinity College, B.10.5 (VgOp S). It was damaged by fire in 1731.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=cotton_ms_vitellius_c_viii_f086r> (CLA II 133).

Further literature: TM 66237.

ƎP [VgO EP]

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 9389

Codex Epternacensis, Echternach Gospels. Four Gospels.

Copied in Northumbria, or possibly Echternach, around 690. Insular minuscule script with some prefatory material in Insular majuscule.

223 folios (33½x26½ cm). Two columns of 24–5 lines (27x21½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication. Full-page pictures with evangelist symbols before each gospel.

Nouum opus is followed by plain canon tables (no divisions). Each gospel is preceded by capitula (KA I), a glossary of Hebrew words and a prologue. The text is written in sense-units; Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages is in the margins. Alternative readings are reported in marginal glosses. A colophon (page 74 above) notes that an exemplar was corrected in 558 from a manuscript belonging to Eugippius.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b530193948>. (CLA V 578).

Editions: Fischer Ge: 93.3 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:52–3, 406; McGurk 1961a no. 59; Fischer 1965 [1985:169], 1972:56–7 [1986:229–30]; McNamara 1987; Bruce-Mitford 1989; McGurk 1994b; O’Sullivan 1994; Glaser & Moulin Fankhänel 1999:104–8; Rohr 2000. TM 66709.

F [Vg F]

See F in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

G, g1

See VL 7.

H [VgO H]

London, British Library, MS Add. 24142

Codex Hubertianus. Bible with Old and New Testaments.

Copied in Tours in the ninth or tenth century. Minuscule script.

248 folios (33x24 cm). Three columns of 62 lines (25½x20 cm).

The manuscript breaks off at 1 Peter 4:3.

The text of the first hand has similarities with the Northumbrian Vulgate tradition, but this has been extensively corrected towards the Vulgate recension of Theodulf.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_24142>.

Editions: Cited in the Oxford Vulgate for the Gospels and Pauline Epistles. Also occasionally cited in Vetus Latina (Θ‎H). Fischer Oh: 94.9 per cent.

(p.270) Further literature: Berger 1893:179–81, 390; Fischer 1963b [1985:94–5]; Gibson 1993:32–3.

I (Gospels) [VgOe I]

Munich, Universitätsbibliothek, 2o 29

Codex Ingolstadiensis. Four Gospels.

Copied in Aachen around 800. Uncial script.

137 folios (32½x22½ cm). Two columns of 31 lines (25½x16 cm). Parchment; black and red ink, with incipits in gold on a purple background. Decorated initials.

Matthew and Luke are only partially preserved.

Images: (CLA IX 1343).

Collation: Fischer Ai: 97.2 per cent.

Further literature: Bischoff 2004:299. TM 67485.

I (Acts, Catholic Epistles, Revelation)

See I in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

J [VgO J]

  1. i) Cividale del Friuli, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, 138

  2. ii) Venice, Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, s. n.

  3. iii) Prague, National Library, Cim. 1

Codex Forojuliensis, Codex Aquileiensis. Four Gospels.

Copied in North Italy (Aquileia) in the sixth or seventh century. Uncial script.

326 folios (30½x26½ cm). Two columns of 19 lines (22½x22 cm). Parchment; black and red ink.

i) consists of 270 folios with Matthew, Luke, and part of John (John 19:24–40 and 20:19–21 and 25 are missing); ii) consists of 40 folios with Mark 1:1–12:20; iii) is 16 folios covering Mark 12:21–16:20. The manuscript has been badly damaged by damp; iii) is the best-preserved portion. Nouum opus is present, but there are no canon tables. The text is written in sense lines. There are two sets of capitula for each gospel, the first headed breues (KA B) and the second capitulationes (KA Ifor). The latter are unique to this manuscript and preserve some Old Latin readings.

Images: (CLA III 285; also CLA X 285).

Editions: Bianchini 1749; Dobrovský 1778; Fischer Jj: 94.3 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a, no. 94, 1994a:19; Scalon & Pani 1998; Bartoli Langeli et al. 2001; Houghton 2011; CLLA 246. TM 66394.

K

See Φ‎G in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

L (Gospels) [VgOe L]

Lichfield, Cathedral Library, s. n.

(p.271) Lichfield Gospels, St Chad Gospels, Llandaff Gospels. Three Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke).

Copied in the first half of the eighth century, possibly in Wales. Insular majuscule script.

236 pages (31x22½ cm). One column of 20 lines (25x19 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication. There are decorated initial pages, evangelist portraits for Mark and Luke and a four symbols page and carpet page before Luke.

The manuscript breaks off at Luke 3:9. There is no prefatory material or Eusebian apparatus. The Lord’s Prayer is written at the end of Mark. Some of the additions to the manuscript include very early examples of Welsh as well as a Latin note that the manuscript was purchased in exchange for a horse.

Images: <https://lichfield.ou.edu/st-chad-gospels/gallery>. (CLA II 159).

Editions: <http://folio.furman.edu/lichfield/>; Scrivener 1887; Hopkins-James 1934. Fischer Hl: 86.3 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 16. TM 66263.

L (Paul) [VgOp L]

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 335

Codex Langobardus. Pauline Epistles.

Copied in the eighth century. Beneventan minuscule script.

156 folios (24½x16½ cm). One column of 18 lines. Parchment; black ink with rubrication. Decorative initials at the beginning of each epistle.

The conclusion of Titus, along with Philemon and Hebrews, was copied in the tenth century. There is no marginal material, although stichometry is present.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9072418x>.

Further literature: Fischer 1971 [1985:337].

L (Catholic Epistles) [VgOc L]

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 2328

Codex Lemovicensis. Catholic Epistles.

Copied around 800; provenance Limoges. Minuscule script.

125 folios (29x17½ cm). Two columns of 33–5 lines. Parchment; black ink with rubrication and decorative initials.

After works by Isidore and Alcuin, the Catholic Epistles occur on foll. 97–107 with no prologues or summaries. They are followed by sermons of Augustine and Caesarius of Arles. The text is a fairly pure Vulgate with some Old Latin readings typical of French witnesses, including one at James 2:13 shared with Ruricius of Limoges.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b52503985b>.

Further literature: Berger 1893:405; Fischer 1965 [1985:120].

M (Gospels) [VgS M]

See M in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

(p.272) M (Acts) [VgOa M]

Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6230

Codex Monacensis. Acts of the Apostles, Catholic Epistles, and Revelation.

Copied in Freising in the tenth century.

127 folios (24½x18½ cm). One column of 20–2 lines (20x13½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

VL 64 part vii, with text from 1 Peter, is an offset in the binding of this manuscript. The final page of Revelation is missing. All books have capitula (KA A in Revelation) and a prologue.

Images: <http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/0011/bsb00115033/images/>.

Editions: Only cited in the Oxford Vulgate for Acts; Cited in Vetus Latina (Apocalypse: M). De Bruyne 1914:370–96 (siglum F).

Further literature: Glauche 2000; Gryson 2000–3:19–20.

M (Pauline Epistles) [VgOp M]

Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6229

Codex Frisingensis. Pauline Epistles, including Laodiceans.

Copied in Freising in the second half of the eighth century. Early Caroline minuscule script.

135 folios (25½x17½ cm). Two columns of 23–7 lines (20½x13 cm). Parchment; black ink.

Laodiceans occurs after Colossians. The manuscript begins with prologues and a concordance to all the Pauline Epistles. There is a prologue and capitula before each Epistle. The text is initially close to Vg A, but there is an increasing proportion of earlier readings in later letters. There are lectionary marks in the margins. Parts of Jerome, Epistula 22 are found on the final five folios of the manuscript.

Images: <http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0004/bsb00047192/images/>. (CLA IX 1251).

Further literature: Fischer 1965 [1985:187]; Glauche 2000. TM 67392.

MT [VgO MT]

Tours, Bibliothèque municipale, 22

Codex Martini (Turonensis). Four Gospels.

Copied in the ninth century, either around the beginning or the second quarter, possibly in Fleury. Uncial script.

289 folios (31x23 cm). Two columns of 25 or 26 lines. Parchment; written in gold ink. Elegant coloured canon tables.

The text is taken from an early Tours edition of the Gospels. The manuscript was used by French royalty for taking oaths as canons of St Martin’s Abbey. There is no Eusebian apparatus in the margins.

Images: <http://bvmm.irht.cnrs.fr/consult/consult.php?reproductionId=8263>, <http://www.enluminures.culture.fr/documentation/enlumine/fr/BM/tours_021-01.htm> (canon tables).

Editions: Cited in Sabatier (S. Mart. Turon.); Fischer Ot: 94.7 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:47–8, 420; Fischer 1965 [1985:147].

(p.273) N [VgO N]

Colmar, Bibliothèque municipale 15 (38), foll. 173–238

Pauline Epistles.

Copied in the ninth century, probably on the European continent. Anglo-Saxon minuscule script.

66 folios (cut to 28½x18 cm). Two columns of 38–40 lines (26½x16 cm). Parchment; black ink. Initials decorated in red and yellow.

The manuscript currently consists of an eighth-century manuscript of the Gospels (foll. 1–172; CLA VI 749) bound with the Pauline Epistles. Hebrews 4:16–end is missing. All epistles begin with capitula and a preface, and have a good Vulgate text. The text is written in sense lines. Greek numerals are used for the chapters.

Images: <http://bvmm.irht.cnrs.fr/consult/consult.php?reproductionId=1930>. (CLA VI 750).

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 32 (Gospels); Fischer 1965 [1985:169, 178]. TM 66920.

O (Gospels) [VgOe O]

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Auct. D.2.14 (Bodley 857)

Gospels of St Augustine. Four Gospels.

Copied in the seventh century, perhaps in Rome. Uncial script.

173 folios (25x19½ cm). Two columns of 29 lines (21x16 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

Matthew 1:1–4:13 is missing. The other gospels have prefaces and capitula (KA B). Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages is in the margins. The presentation is similar to VgO X. A number of readings are shared with Irish gospel books.

Images: (CLA II 230).

Editions: Fischer Jo: 94.2 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:35–6; McGurk 1961a no. 32; Verey 1998; Marsden 1999; Ganz 2001. TM 66321

O (Acts) [VgOa O]

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Selden Supra 30 (Bodley 3418)

Codex Oxoniensis. Acts of the Apostles.

Copied in Kent in the eighth century. Uncial script.

54 folios (23x17½ cm). One column of 24–6 lines (17–19x13–15 cm). Parchment; black ink with coloured decoration of the first letter. Acts 14:27–15:32 is missing.

Images: (CLA II 257).

Further literature: Brown 2006:54–5. TM 66343

O (Pauline Epistles) [VgOp O]

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Laud. lat. 108

(p.274) Codex Laudianus. Pauline Epistles

Copied in the first half of the ninth century, possibly in Würzburg. Minuscule script.

117 folios (25½x19 cm). One column of 21 lines. Parchment; black ink with red and yellow decoration.

The manuscript is a copy of Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek, M.p.th.f. 69, an eighth-century codex of the Pauline Epistles with Insular features. The epistles have prefaces and capitula.

Images: Oxford Digital Library (two images).

Editions: Buchanan 1914a; Tischendorf x2.

Further literature: Berger 1893:398; Frede 1962–4:17*–18*; Fischer 1965 [1985:174]; Frede 1966–71:18.

O (Catholic Epistles) [VgOc O]

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Laud. lat. 103

Codex Oxoniensis. Catholic Epistles.

Copied in Germany in the first half of the twelfth century.

Parchment; black ink with decorated initials.

O (Revelation) [VgOr O]

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Laud. lat. 43

Codex Oxoniensis. Catholic Epistles and Revelation.

Copied in England in the twelfth or thirteenth century.

One column (apart from the prologues). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

The text is accompanied by a gloss. There are three prologues for the Catholic Epistles, but no prologue or capitula for Revelation.

Editions: Buchanan 1916. Only cited for Revelation in the Oxford Vulgate; cited in Vetus Latina (Ω‎O).

P (Gospels) [VgOe P]

Perugia, Biblioteca Capitolare 1.

Codex Perusinus. Part of Luke.

Copied in Umbria in the second half of the sixth century. Uncial script.

46 folios (32x26 cm). Two columns of 27 lines (22x19 cm). Parchment; black ink.

The manuscript contains Luke 1:26–12:8. Fragments of John found in the binding of manuscript 29 (renumbered as Biblioteca Capitolare 3) may no longer be available.

Images: (CLA IV 407).

Editions: Bianchini 1749; Fischer Jp: 93.9 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1961a no. 100; Fischer 1965 [1985:199]. TM 66511.

P (Pauline Epistles) [VgOp P]

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, nouv. acq. latin 1063

Gospels and Epistles, including Laodiceans.

(p.275) Copied in Corbie in the last third of the seventh century.12 Merovingian cursive minuscule script.

120 folios (22x14½ cm). Two columns of 28–34 lines (19x11½ cm). Parchment; black ink. Each book begins with a zoomorphic initial and the opening lines written in red uncial script.

Matthew 1:1–26:4 is missing. The other gospels have prefaces but no capitula. Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages in the margin. The Pauline Epistles have prologues but only Romans has capitula. Laodiceans comes between Philemon and Hebrews. The manuscript breaks off at Hebrews 7:14. There are contemporary liturgical notes.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10510172h>. (CLA V 679).

Editions: Fischer Gi: 92.9 per cent.

Further literature: McGurk 1994a:20; Tewes 2011:204; Ganz 2012:326. TM 66847.

Q [VgO Q]

Dublin, Trinity College, MS 58

Codex Kenanensis, Book of Kells. Four Gospels.

Copied in the early ninth century, in Ireland, Scotland, or possibly Northumbria. Insular majuscule script.

340 folios (33x25 cm). One column of 17 lines (25x17 cm). Parchment; black ink with much coloured decoration, including numerous zoomorphic initials and pictures. Several full page illustrations, including four symbol pages before each Gospel, and a single four symbols page.

There are initial canon tables; each Gospel is preceded by prefaces and capitula (KA I); lists of Hebrew names are given for Matthew and Luke. The manuscript breaks off at John 17:13.

Images: <http://digitalcollections.tcd.ie/home/#folder_id=14&pidtopage=MS58_001r&entry_point=1>; Alton, Meyer & Simms 1950 (complete facsimile, mostly monochrome); Alexander & Fox 1990 (colour facsimile). (CLA II 274).

Editions: Fischer Hq: 89.2 per cent (ranging from 77.1 per cent in Matthew14 to 94.3 per cent in Luke34).

Further literature: Berger 1893:41–2; McGurk 1961a no. 87; Brown & Verey 1972; Brown 1980; McGurk 1994b; O’Mahony 1994; Meehan 1995; Farr 1997; O’Reilly in Sharpe & Van Kampen 1998; Pulliam 2006; Meehan 2012. TM 66360.

R (Gospels) [VgOe R]

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Auct. D.2.19 (Bodley 3964)

Rushworth Gospels, MacRegol Gospels. Four Gospels.

(p.276) Copied in Ireland around 800. Insular majuscule script.

169 folios (35x27 cm). One column of 22 lines (27x21 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication. There are evangelist portraits (some now missing) and large initial pages.

Luke 4:29–8:38, 10:20–38, and 15:14–16:25 are missing. There is no prefatory material or Eusebian apparatus. The highest concentration of Old Latin readings is found in the second half of Matthew and the middle of Luke. An Old English gloss was added throughout the manuscript by two scribes probably in Yorkshire in the late tenth century.

Images: <https://digital.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/inquire/p/b708f563-b804-42b5-bd0f-2826dfaeb5cc>. (CLA II 231).

Editions: Tamoto 2013. Fischer Hr: 87.1 per cent (ranging from 74.9 per cent in Luke33 to 93 per cent in Mark11).

Further literature: Hemphill 1911; McGurk 1961a no. 33. TM 66322.

R (Acts)

See VL 62 above.

R (Pauline Epistles)

See R in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

S (Gospels) [VgOe S]

London, British Library, MS Add. 89000

Cuthbert Gospel (formerly Stonyhurst St John).13 John.

Copied in Northumbria at the end of the seventh century. Uncial script.

90 folios (13½x9½ cm). One column of 19 lines (9½x6½ cm). Parchment; black ink with red initials.

Found in the tomb of St Cuthbert in 1104. The text is arranged in sense-units, sometimes over two lines. The coloured initials correspond to the KA C divisions. There are four lection markings.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_89000>. Brown 1969 (facsimile). (CLA II 260).

Editions: Fischer Ns: 97.5 per cent.

Further literature: Mynors and Powell 1956; McGurk 1961a no. 37; Gibson 1993:26–7; Breay & Meehan 2015. TM 66346.

S (Acts)

See S (Acts and Revelation) in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

S (Pauline Epistles) [VgOp S]

Cambridge, Trinity College B.10.5

Pauline Epistles (partial).

(p.277) Copied in Northumbria in the first half of the eighth century. Insular minuscule script.

67 folios (29½x23 cm). One column of 27 lines (25x16½ cm). Parchment; black ink with red and yellow decoration.

The manuscript begins at 1 Corinthians 7:32 and contains the rest of the Pauline Epistles up to and including Hebrews. Five folios are currently in London, cited as VgOp E. There are numerous Latin marginal and interlinear glosses. The capitula and preface at the beginning of each Epistle are written in two columns.

Images: <http://trin-sites-pub.trin.cam.ac.uk/manuscripts/B_10_5/manuscript.php?fullpage=1>. (CLA II 133).

Edition: De Paor (in preparation).

Further literature: McGurk 1994a:18. TM 66237.

T [VgO T]

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional, Vitr. 13-1 (Tol. 2-1).

Codex Toletanus. Bible with Old and New Testament, including Laodiceans (epcar).

Copied in southern Spain around 950 for Bishop Servandus. Visigothic minuscule script.

375 folios (44x32 cm). Three columns of 63–5 lines. Parchment; black and red ink.

Decorated canon tables. Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages in the margin of the Gospels; Priscillian’s canon numbers in the Pauline Epistles. Laodiceans appears after Colossians. There are capitula before Revelation (KA Sp).

Images: <http://bibliotecadigitalhispanica.bne.es:80/webclient/DeliveryManager?pid=1723042>.

Editions: Bianchini 1740 (reprinted in PL 29: 915–1152). Occasionally cited in Vetus Latina (Σ‎T). Fischer St: 93.1 per cent. (CLA XI 1654, although Lowe’s dating is no longer accepted.)

Further literature: Berger 1893:12–14, 391; Lowe 1923; Smith 1924; Millares Carlo 1925; Fischer 1963b [1985:70]; Frede 1976b; Gryson 2000–3:31–2.

U (Gospels) [VgOe U]

Utrecht, Bibliotheek der Rijksuniversiteit, 32, foll. 94–104

Fragmenta Ultratraiectina. Fragments of Matthew and John.

Copied in Jarrow around 720. Anglo-Saxon uncial script.

11 folios (31x24 cm). Two columns of 30 lines (25x19½ cm). Parchment; black and red ink, gold for the initial lines. Decorations in green, blue, and yellow.

The manuscript is bound with the Utrecht Psalter (VL 423). The first eight folios consist of prefatory material (Nouum opus, Plures fuisse, a prologue and KA C for Matthew), including a title page to the four gospels with a Greek invocation. These are followed by Matthew 1:1–3:4 and John 1:1–21.

(p.278) Images: <http://psalter.library.uu.nl/page?p=194>; Birch 1873 (facsimile); van der Horst et al 1982 (facsimile). (CLA X 1587).

Editions: Fischer Nu: 97.6 per cent.

Further literature: Lowe 1952; McGurk 1961a no. 81. TM 67752.

U (Acts, Epistles, Revelation) [VgOa U]

London, British Library, MS Add. 11852

Codex Ulmensis. Latter part of New Testament (pacr).

Copied in the ninth century, possibly in St Gall. Minuscule script.

215 folios (23½x17cm). One column of 23–5 lines. Parchment; black and red ink.

There are prefaces, marginal chapter numbers and stichometry. The text has been described as the local text of the Bodensee area and is related to VgSar S. It was once thought to have been copied by Abbot Hartmut.

Images: <http://www.stgallplan.org/stgallmss/viewItem.do?ark=p21198-zz002971c4>.

Editions: Cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (σ‎U).

Further literature: Berger 1893:126–7, 390; Fischer 1965 [1985:181].

V

See Φ‎V in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

W [VgO W]

London, British Library, Royal I.B.12

Codex Sarisburiensis, Bible of William of Hales. Bible with Old and New Testaments (eacpr).

Copied in Salisbury by William of Hales in 1254. Gothic script.

431 folios (35x20 cm). Two columns of 51 lines (20x12 cm). Parchment; black, red, and blue ink with gold and other colours in decorated initials.

According to Glunz, the text is copied from Salisbury Cathedral MS 148. Some of the illustrations are by the ‘Sarum Master’.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=7160> (7 images).

Editions: Also cited occasionally in Vetus Latina (Ω‎W; W in Mark).

Further literature: Glunz 1933.

X [VgO X]

Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, 286

Gospels of St Augustine. Four Gospels.

Copied at the end of the sixth century, possibly in Rome. Uncial script.

265 folios (24½x18 cm). Two columns of 25 lines (18½x13½ cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication for the first line of each chapter. Full page illustrations with multiple scenes and evangelist portraits (only preserved for Luke).

The gospels begin with prefaces and capitula (KA B). There is Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages. The canon tables are likely to have been in a missing initial quire. Corrections have been added in a Northumbrian hand.

(p.279) Images: <http://parkerweb.stanford.edu/parker/actions/page_turner.do?ms_no=286>. (CLA II 126).

Collation: Fischer Jx: 96.3 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:35; Wormald 1954; McGurk 1961a no. 3; McGurk 1994a:16; Marsden 1999. TM 66230.

Y [VgO Y]

London, British Library, Cotton Nero D.IV

Lindisfarne Gospels, Codex Lindisfarnensis. Four Gospels.

Copied in Lindisfarne around 700. Anglo-Saxon majuscule script.

259 folios (36½x27½ cm). Two columns of 24 lines (23½x19 cm). Parchment; black and red ink with multiple colours used in decoration. Evangelist portraits, carpet pages, and large ornate initials.

Prefatory material: Nouum opus, Plures fuisse, and Eusebius Carpiano followed by decorated canon tables. Each Gospel is preceded by a preface and capitula (KA C); there is a list of Neapolitan feasts (also found in British Library, Royal 1.B.VII). Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages. The text is closely related to Vg A. An Old English gloss was added throughout by Aldred in Chester-le-Street in the late tenth century. In the capitula for John, some lectionary indications have been copied as titles within the text.

Images: <http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Cotton_MS_nero_d_iv>. Kendrick et al. 1956–60; Brown 2002. (CLA II 187). Image 15 in the present volume.

Editions: Fischer Ny: 96.6 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:39–41, 385; McGurk 1955; Kendrick et al. 1956–60; McGurk 1961a no. 22; Gibson 1993:26–7; McGurk 1993; Backhouse 1994; Gameson 1994:42; O’Sullivan 1994; Brown 2003, 2011; Gameson 2013. TM 66291.

Z (Gospels)

See Z in the Stuttgart Vulgate.

Z (Epistles and Revelation)

See VL 65 above.

Δ‎ [VgO Δ‎]

  1. i) Durham, Cathedral Library, A.II.16, foll. 1–23, 34–86, 102

  2. ii) Durham, Cathedral Library, A.II.16, foll. 24–33, 87–101

  3. iii) Durham, Cathedral Library, A.II.16, foll. 103–34.

Codex Dunelmensis. Four Gospels.14

(p.280) Copied in Northumbria in the eighth century. i) is in uncial script, ii) and iii) in Insular majuscule script.

134 folios (35x24½ cm). Two columns; i) and iii) have 30 lines per page, ii) has 27–8 (27x20 cm). Parchment; black ink with rubrication.

i) contains Matthew 2:13–22:15, Mark, Luke 1:57–16:15; ii) contains replacement leaves for Matthew 23:3–28:14 and Luke 16:15–end; iii) contains John 1:27–15:16 and 16:33–21:8. There is a prologue and capitula for Mark (KA C).

Both i) and ii) have a text similar to the Echternach Gospels (VgO EP), while iii) resembles Codex Amiatinus (Vg A). There are liturgical indications of different speakers in the Passion narratives. Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages is found in the margins of ii and iii.

Images: <https://iiif.durham.ac.uk/index.html?manifest=t2mqj72p7126> (CLA II 148 a,b,c).

Editions: Fischer i) Nd: 90.2 per cent; ii) Ne: 90 per cent; iii) Nf: 97.6 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:381–2; McGurk 1961a nos 10–12; Verey 1969–70; Bruce-Mitford 1989. TM 66248, 66249, 66250.

Θ‎ [VgO Θ‎]

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 9380

Codex Theodulfianus, Codex Mesmianus, Mesmes Bible. Bible: Old and New Testaments (epcar).

Copied in Orléans or Fleury around 800. Caroline minuscule script.

349 folios (32x23 cm). Two columns of 62 lines (23½x16 cm). Purple parchment with silver and gold ink in the Gospels (ordo euangelicus); normal parchment with black and red ink in the rest of the New Testament (ordo apostolicus).

This is an early copy of a Theodulf Bible. The gospels have Eusebian apparatus with parallel passages; the Pauline Epistles have Priscillian canons. In the Old Testament there is a large number of interlinear corrections and alternatives contemporary with the production of the manuscript. After the biblical text, there is a list of lections, then De nominibus hebraeis and the Liber de diuinis scripturis (PS-AU spe).

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8452776m>. (CLA V 576).

Editions: Cited occasionally in the Vetus Latina edition (Θ‎M). Fischer Om: 95.5 per cent.

Further literature: Berger 1893:149–76, 405–6; Fischer 1963b [1985:95].

Loewe 1969; Gryson 2000–3:27. TM 66707.

Π‎ [VgO Π‎]

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, nouv. acq. latin 1132

Codex Parisinus. Revelation.

Copied in northern France at the turn of the tenth century. Caroline minuscule script.

(p.281) 40 folios (29x21 cm). One column of 20 lines (23x14 cm). Parchment; black and red ink. The text alternates with numerous coloured drawings, the principal colours being blue, red, and yellow.

Revelation occupies the first 36 folios; the remaining four contain the Fables of Avianus. The extensive interlinear and marginal glosses were added in the fourteenth century.

Images: <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8426793j>.

Σ‎ [VgO Σ‎]

Trier, Stadtbibliothek, MS 31

Codex Triverensis, Trier Apocalypse. Revelation.

Copied in northern France around 800. Half-uncial and Caroline minuscule scripts.

75 folios (26x21½ cm). One column of 19 lines (20 in the first quire). Parchment; black ink with rubrication. The biblical text alternates with full-page colour images.

The classical parallels in the illustrations have led to suggestions that their source may date to the fifth century or earlier. The text corresponds to an Italian Vulgate, although there are extensive erasures and eleventh-century corrections. The first-hand text was, in fact, Vulgate: the corrections are adjustments to match the texts with the pictures. There is no prefatory material.

Images: Klein & Laufner 1975 (facsimile), Klein 2001 (facsimile), <http://www.johannesoffenbarung.ch/bilderzyklen/trierer1.php> (illustrations only).

Edition: Also cited in Vetus Latina (Υ‎T for main text, Υ‎Tr for readings above erasures).

Further literature: Fischer 1965 [1985:151]; Klein & Laufner 1975; Renna 1990; Gryson 2000–3:33; Morgan 2012.

The following are occasionally cited as additional witnesses in the Oxford Vulgate but do not appear as principal manuscripts in either of the other editions:

arg. Codex Argenteus. Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, latin 9451. A lectionary written in silver ink on purple parchment, copied around the beginning of the ninth century. (CLA V 580). Cited for some readings in Acts. <http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b6001307x>.

div. Codex Divionensis. Dijon, Bibliothèque municipale, 15. (‘Bible of Stephen Harding’); Fourth volume of a complete Bible, containing the New Testament in the order eacpr. Copied in Cîteaux in 1109. Occasionally cited as Ω‎D in Vetus Latina.

haf. Codex Hafnianus. Copenhagen, Univ. Bibliotek, Arnamagnaeaske Legat AM. 795 4to. Revelation, followed by Apringius’ Commentary (APR). Copied in Catalonia in the twelfth century. Cited as κ‎K in Vetus Latina. See description in Gryson 2000–3:38.

m. Speculum. The patristic testimonia collection, Liber de diuinis scripturis (PS-AU spe in Vetus Latina).

s (Acts, Catholic Epistles). Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, lat. 16. (p.282)

Notes:

(1) See page 129 above.

(2) Fischer 1988–91, 2010; see page 125, where a list of test-passages is also provided. For example, Mark23 indicates test-passage 23 in Mark.

(3) I am grateful to Dr Michael Stansfield for confirming the extent of these pages.

(4) Gryson 1999:60 reverses the position of the languages.

(5) In Metzger 1977 and earlier versions of the Register, the Book of Dimma (Dublin, Trinity College, MS 59) is given the number VL 43.

(6) The final six images are not included in the standard navigation, but may be accessed directly by adjusting the ‘p=’ value in the address.

(7) Note that VL 61 is given the siglum D in the Stuttgart Vulgate for Laodiceans.

(8) VgOp M is given the siglum M in the Stuttgart Vulgate for Laodiceans.

(9) See page 202 above.

(10) McGurk 1961a gives the page size as 32x24 cm.

(11) See page 155.

(12) The date and location follow a private communication from David Ganz (article forthcoming in Revue bénédictine, 2016).

(13) There is also an eighth-century set of ‘Cuthbert Gospels’ which take their name from their Anglo-Saxon copyist: Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, lat. 1224 (McGurk 1961a no. 42).

(14) Note that these are not the Durham Gospels, which bear the shelfmark A.II.17 (see page 73).