Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
After the InvasionA Reading of Jeremiah 40-44$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Keith Bodner

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198743002

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198743002.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 26 May 2019

Absconding to Egypt

Absconding to Egypt

Chapter:
(p.108) (p.109) 6 Absconding to Egypt
Source:
After the Invasion
Author(s):

Keith Bodner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198743002.003.0007

Chapter 6 focuses on Jer 43:1–13, a section of text with two parts: the rejection of Jeremiah’s counsel and departure for the Egyptian city of Tahpanhes in vv. 1–7, followed by Jeremiah’s prophetic sign-act and oracle in vv. 8–13 that forecast the arrival of Nebuchadrezzar into Egypt itself. Having rejected Jeremiah’s counsel against fleeing to Egypt, the community accuses the prophet and his accomplice Baruch of falsehood. This chapter analyzes Baruch’s role and why he might be mentioned here. It discusses the irony of Jeremiah’s descent into Egypt: he spends his career persuading the community of Judah to trust in the God who brought them out of Egypt, but now he is taken there as a virtual captive. Yet the prophet’s energy has not abated, and an assessment is made of his energetic sign for the community and the attendant oracle anticipating that Nebuchadrezzar will follow.

Keywords:   Tahpanhes, Egypt, Baruch, prophetic sign-acts, metaphors, Jeremiah, Nebuchadrezzar, Judah

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .