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The Chemical Bond in Inorganic Chemistry$
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I. David Brown

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198742951

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198742951.001.0001

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Chemical Implications of the Bond Valence Model

Chemical Implications of the Bond Valence Model

Chapter:
(p.250) 13 Chemical Implications of the Bond Valence Model
Source:
The Chemical Bond in Inorganic Chemistry
Author(s):

I. David Brown

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198742951.003.0013

The success of chemical bond models can be ascribed to the similarity between the properties of the chemical bond and those of the electrostatic flux (bond flux), but flux theory and quantum theory have little in common. They are complementary approaches to the analysis of chemical bonding. Because they both describe the same chemical structures it is interesting to compare the bond valence model using the procrystal charge density with QTAIM (Section 13.2). By having a sound physical basis, the bond valence model avoids the problems encountered by the quasi-physical bond models in popular use (Section 13.4). Section 13.3 discusses some aspects of the flux model not covered in earlier chapters.

Keywords:   bond flux, charge density, procrystal, QTAIM

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