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The Religious Lives of Older LaywomenThe Last Active Anglican Generation$
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Abby Day

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198739586

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198739586.001.0001

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Doing Theology

Doing Theology

Chapter:
(p.92) 5 Doing Theology
Source:
The Religious Lives of Older Laywomen
Author(s):

Abby Day

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198739586.003.0005

This chapter considers several fieldwork case examples and further historical evidence to construct a profile of Generation A as teachers, lay-preachers, readers, biblical scholars, and activists. In the UK, the Mothers’ Union was a safe, woman-centred organization led by Generation A, designed to promote values of an idealized Christian woman as wife and mother. It continues to be active in the global South. In the global North it acts mainly to raise money for international projects and key campaigns. Generation A laywomen often historically opposed the ordination of women and then, later, their admission as bishops. The reasons for this given in public, voiced by male bishops rather than women, speak of biblical inerrancy based on Christ not having female disciples or teachers. The lived experience on the ground is more variable, differing not only from country to country but sometimes within countries, and by what is meant by ‘ministry’.

Keywords:   power, resistance, ordination, ministry, homosexuality, bishops

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