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The Senecan AestheticA Performance History$
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Helen Slaney

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198736769

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198736769.001.0001

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Nourished on Blood

Nourished on Blood

Chapter:
(p.99) 3 Nourished on Blood
Source:
The Senecan Aesthetic
Author(s):

Helen Slaney

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198736769.003.0004

French tragedy of the same period (sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries) was likewise experiencing rapid change, transformed within a generation from an academic pastime into a fully-fledged profession. Initially performed within the collège (university) communities, Seneca entered the repertoire of touring companies and was translated for outdoor performance on temporary stages by playwrights such as Robert Garnier and Jean de La Taille. With the establishment of the first permanent venues in Paris, the Hôtel de Bourgogne and the Théâtre du Marais, companies began to take advantage of the scenography and special effects now available to fuse Senecan tragedy with baroque spectacle. Whereas English playwrights tended to apply senecan features to different plots, Senecan plays in their entirety were performed much more frequently in France.

Keywords:   Robert Garnier, Corneille, Médée, Medea, Hercule, Alexandre Hardy, French baroque, Jean de La Taille, Jean de La Péruse

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