Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Civics Beyond CriticsCharacter Education in a Liberal Democracy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ian MacMullen

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198733614

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198733614.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 November 2019

Evaluating education for compliance: a cost-benefit analysis

Evaluating education for compliance: a cost-benefit analysis

Chapter:
(p.79) Chapter 3 Evaluating education for compliance: a cost-benefit analysis
Source:
Civics Beyond Critics
Author(s):

Ian MacMullen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198733614.003.0003

This chapter argues against the highly restrictive view of permissible education for law-abidingness to which most theorists and philosophers of education are committed. This orthodox view would not come close to producing the very high rate of compliance with laws that is morally required in a reasonably just liberal democracy. The chapter goes on to systematically identify the various costs associated with educational strategies that sacrifice autonomy for the sake of compliance. The principal challenge is to identify the ways in which acts of compliance can be suboptimal despite being morally permissible: the analysis here focuses on acts that either fail to express the agent’s own judgment or express a judgment that reflects inauthentic preferences or false beliefs. The chapter concludes that, when children are educated for compliance in ways that deviate moderately and judiciously from autonomy-maximizing education, the benefits of such education will typically outweigh the costs

Keywords:   autonomy, inauthentic preferences, compliance, law-abidingness, false beliefs

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .