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The Fight Against Hunger and MalnutritionThe Role of Food, Agriculture, and Targeted Policies$
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David E. Sahn

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198733201

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198733201.001.0001

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Distributional Impacts of the 2008 Global Food Price Spike in Vietnam

Distributional Impacts of the 2008 Global Food Price Spike in Vietnam

Chapter:
(p.373) 16 Distributional Impacts of the 2008 Global Food Price Spike in Vietnam
Source:
The Fight Against Hunger and Malnutrition
Author(s):

Andy McKay

Finn Tarp

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198733201.003.0017

Agriculture remains a key sector in the Vietnamese economy. Higher world market prices should have a beneficial impact on rural farmers, assuming that world prices are transmitted and that farmers can respond. Further, many poorer farm households may be net consumers. Using data from two household survey data sets, combined with available macro-data, this chapter investigates how global price changes impacted rural welfare during 2006–12, studying the case of rice in the context of the 2008 food price spike. The chapter analyzes the responses of domestic producer and consumer prices and discusses policy actions by the government. It also analyzes the distributional impact of resulting domestic price changes. Vietnam was able to manage domestic prices, and many more poor households benefitted from the price increase than lost.

Keywords:   food prices, rice, Vietnam, transmission, markets, government intervention

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