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The Prospect of Global History$
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James Belich, John Darwin, Margret Frenz, and Chris Wickham

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198732259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198732259.001.0001

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Writing Constitutions and Writing World History

Writing Constitutions and Writing World History

Chapter:
(p.160) 9 Writing Constitutions and Writing World History
Source:
The Prospect of Global History
Author(s):

Linda Colley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198732259.003.0010

Global history should seek to make itself useful, not just drawing on existing specialist histories, but also suggesting perspectives and connections that the latter may have ignored or downplayed. This chapter discusses how examining the proliferation of written constitutions after 1750 in wide, trans-national terms contributes to our understanding of communications, empire, war, and gender and change in the long nineteenth century. It also explores how adopting global history perspectives and strategies—rather than examining constitutions only in a national or regional context—expands and challenges some customary views of the meanings and repercussions of these political and legal devices over time.

Keywords:   global history, constitutions, eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, communications, empire, war, gender, perspectives, and strategies

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