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Ownership and Exploitation of Land and Natural Resources in the Roman World$
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Paul Erdkamp, Koenraad Verboven, and Arjan Zuiderhoek

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198728924

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198728924.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 September 2019

Conclusions

Conclusions

Overview of Presented Arguments

Chapter:
(p.339) 18 Conclusions
Source:
Ownership and Exploitation of Land and Natural Resources in the Roman World
Author(s):

Paul Erdkamp

Koenraad Verboven

Arjan Zuiderhoek

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198728924.003.0018

This book has dealt with the exploitation and management of land and natural resources in the Roman economy, with the aim of investigating whether or not Roman strategies of land and resource exploitation were conducive to economic growth. Despite the recent surge of interest in Roman economic history, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the exploitation of land and natural resources. Drawing inspiration from insights developed within the field of NIE, the book has asked whether or not Roman institutions made possible forms of land and resource exploitation that would result in increased productivity and growth over time. The chapters have considered issues such as ownership, (legal) control, and the (organizational framework for) exploitation and processing of vital resources and raw materials such as agricultural land, livestock, water, precious metals, salt, stone, and others, throughout the Mediterranean region and beyond during Roman, late Roman, and immediately post-Roman times.

Keywords:   Roman resource exploitation, Roman economic growth, ancient Roman economy, New Institutional Economics, Roman economic performance, Roman economic institutions, factors of production

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