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Towards a Better Global EconomyPolicy Implications for Citizens Worldwide in the 21st Century$
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Franklin Allen, Jere R. Behrman, Nancy Birdsall, Shahrokh Fardoust, Dani Rodrik, Andrew Steer, and Arvind Subramanian

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198723455

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723455.001.0001

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Global Markets, Global Citizens, and Global Governance in the Twenty-first Century1

Global Markets, Global Citizens, and Global Governance in the Twenty-first Century1

Chapter:
(p.427) 7 Global Markets, Global Citizens, and Global Governance in the Twenty-first Century1
Source:
Towards a Better Global Economy
Author(s):

Nancy Birdsall

Christian Meyer

Alexis Sowa

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723455.003.0007

The politics, rules, and institutions of cooperation among nations have not kept up with the demands from global citizens for changes in the global political order. Whether norms and policies can make the global politics of managing the global economy more effective, more legitimate, and more responsive to the needs of the bottom half of the world’s population, for whom life remains harsh, remains to be seen. There is some cause for optimism, however: citizens everywhere are becoming more aware of and active in seeking changes in the global norms and rules that could make the global system and the global economy fairer-in processes if not outcomes-and less environmentally harmful.

Keywords:   global economic governance, role of citizens, citizen activism, public opinion, global middle class, international financial institutions, World Bank, IMF, United Nations, fairness

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