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Shared Decision Making in Health CareAchieving evidence-based patient choice$
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Glyn Elwyn, Adrian Edwards, and Rachel Thompson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198723448

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723448.001.0001

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Demystifying decision aids

Demystifying decision aids

A practical guide for clinicians

Chapter:
(p.51) Chapter 9 Demystifying decision aids
Source:
Shared Decision Making in Health Care
Author(s):

Rachel Thompson

Lyndal Trevena

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723448.003.0009

Shared decision making (SDM) is widely recognized as a strategy for delivering person-centered medicine and upholding the autonomy of patients. Less widespread, however, is an appreciation of how to embed SDM in the real-world delivery of health care. In this chapter, we provide practical guidance on using decisions aids, which represent one strategy for supporting SDM. We define decision aids and explain what sets these tools apart from traditional patient information materials. We review the types of decision aids available, summarize evidence of the benefits of using decision aids, and provide guidance in finding relevant decision aids and judging their quality. Finally, we offer case examples illustrating different ways of integrating decision aids into routine clinical practice and provide suggestions of how clinicians can facilitate SDM in the absence of a decision aid.

Keywords:   Shared decision making, decision aid, decision support intervention, patient-clinician communication, International Patient Decision Aid Standards, case studies

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