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Shared Decision Making in Health CareAchieving evidence-based patient choice$
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Glyn Elwyn, Adrian Edwards, and Rachel Thompson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198723448

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723448.001.0001

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Implementing shared decision making

Implementing shared decision making

A systematic review

Chapter:
(p.150) Chapter 23 Implementing shared decision making
Source:
Shared Decision Making in Health Care
Author(s):

France Légaré

Isabelle Scholl

Dawn Stacey

Stéphane Turcotte

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198723448.003.0023

Shared decision making (SDM) is not yet a reality in most clinical practices. A recently updated Cochrane review of the effectiveness of interventions to implement SDM in clinical practices found 39 studies. Interventions that targeted both patients and clinicians appeared most promising. For example, two important ways for clinicians and organizations to introduce SDM into clinical practice were to provide clinicians with training in SDM and to provide patients with decision aids. Also, any intervention at all was better than none, but the quality of the evidence was low in the studies. Only five studies had our main outcome of interest as their primary outcome, i.e. improved SDM; mostly, it was a secondary outcome. Most studies were also performed in rich countries, focused on a single disease instead of on the many health conditions that are dealt with in primary care, and only one looked at cost.

Keywords:   Shared decision making, implementation, systematic review, Cochrane, training, decision aids

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