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Global EnergyIssues, Potentials, and Policy Implications$
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Paul Ekins, Mike Bradshaw, and Jim Watson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198719526

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.001.0001

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The global energy context

The global energy context

Chapter:
(p.9) 1 The global energy context
Source:
Global Energy
Author(s):

Jim Skea

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.003.0002

This chapter looks first at global energy trends, focusing on three main themes: energy and economic development seen through the lens of regional trends; energy supply; and energy demand. Energy demand is saturating in developed economies but there is rapid growth in the emerging economies, while in low-income countries higher levels of energy use are needed to underpin economic development. Section 1.3 opens up the energy security issue by looking first at physical resource availability then at trends in global energy trade and markets. Section 1.4 looks at the climate change challenge in relation to energy, putting it in the context of resource availability. It is clear that resource availability cannot be relied upon to limit climate change. Section 1.5 reviews energy projections and scenarios produced by some major businesses and public sector organizations, concluding that energy futures are not only uncertain but contested.

Keywords:   energy, development, climate change, energy trade, energy resources, energy markets, energy security

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