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Global EnergyIssues, Potentials, and Policy Implications$
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Paul Ekins, Mike Bradshaw, and Jim Watson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198719526

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.001.0001

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Unconventional fossil fuels and technological change

Unconventional fossil fuels and technological change

Chapter:
(p.268) 14 Unconventional fossil fuels and technological change
Source:
Global Energy
Author(s):

Michael Bradshaw

Murtala Chindo

Joseph Dutton

Kärg Kama

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.003.0015

This chapter explores unconventional fossil fuels that are now seen as critical to meeting future energy demand. It explains the ‘conditional’ nature of these resources and identifies the various types of unconventional fossil fuel. The remainder of the chapter is given over to three case studies: oil shales, oil sands, and shale gas. Each case examines the history of development, the key technologies, and the current status of production. In conclusion, it is suggested that both oil and oil sands will continue to have a limited and localized impact. Shale gas and tight oil, by comparison, have the potential to have a significant impact due to their ubiquity and reliance upon proven and widely available technologies.

Keywords:   unconventional fossil fuel, oil shales, oil sands, shale gas, tight oil

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