Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Global EnergyIssues, Potentials, and Policy Implications$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul Ekins, Mike Bradshaw, and Jim Watson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198719526

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 January 2020

Fossil fuels

Fossil fuels

reserves, cost curves, production, and consumption

Chapter:
(p.244) 13 Fossil fuels
Source:
Global Energy
Author(s):

Michael Bradshaw

Antony Froggatt

Christophe McGlade

Jamie Speirs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.003.0014

The chapter focuses on the fossil fuels that currently dominate the global energy system. The first part examines the complex issues of reserve definitions and cost curves and seeks to provide clarity concerning the various ways that resource availability is discussed. The second part examines each fossil fuel in turn and discusses contemporary reserve estimates, and patterns of production on consumption. The analysis suggests that physical scarcity is not the key driver in relation to fossil fuels; however, in the case of oil and gas relative abundance is dependent on unconventional resources. The conclusion explains how the future prospects for each fossil fuel differ as a result of the interplay of geopolitics and climate change policy.

Keywords:   fossil fuels, coal, oil, natural gas, reserve classifications, cost curves

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .