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Representations of the Gypsy in the Romantic Period$
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Sarah Houghton-Walker

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198719472

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719472.001.0001

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Aesthetic Theories and Literary Traditions

Aesthetic Theories and Literary Traditions

Accommodating the Gypsy in Art

Chapter:
(p.186) 7 Aesthetic Theories and Literary Traditions
Source:
Representations of the Gypsy in the Romantic Period
Author(s):

Sarah Houghton-Walker

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719472.003.0008

This chapter considers some of the key aesthetic theories of the Romantic period and their ramifications for depictions of gypsies, understanding aesthetic discourse as another pressure bearing upon these representations. The categories of sensibility, curiosity, the picturesque, the sublime, and the Gothic are examined in order to explore the ways in which contemporary aesthetic discourses might have problematized or encouraged the inclusion of gypsies in literary texts. The chapter considers the writings of theorists including Hume, Smith, Burke, Gilpin, Repton, and Price, alongside those whose writing is marked by or challenges their ideas (including Hannah More, Mary Robinson, George Crabbe, William Combe, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, and Jane Austen).

Keywords:   sensibility, curiosity, picturesque, sublime, Gothic, Mary Robinson, George Crabbe, William Combe, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis

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