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Stressors in the Marine EnvironmentPhysiological and ecological responses; societal implications$
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Martin Solan and Nia Whiteley

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198718826

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718826.001.0001

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The cellular responses of marine algae and invertebrates to ultraviolet radiation, alone and in combination with other common abiotic stressors

The cellular responses of marine algae and invertebrates to ultraviolet radiation, alone and in combination with other common abiotic stressors

Chapter:
(p.117) Chapter 7 The cellular responses of marine algae and invertebrates to ultraviolet radiation, alone and in combination with other common abiotic stressors
Source:
Stressors in the Marine Environment
Author(s):

David J. Burritt

Miles D. Lamare

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718826.003.0007

This chapter provides an overview of the key physiological responses in marine algae and invertebrates exposed to ultraviolet radiation. It outlines the importance of spectral irradiances and biological weighting functions and discusses in what ways UV-B radiation may influence the responses of marine organisms to stressors associated with climate change and pollution, including ocean warming, elevated pCO2 and ocean acidification, desiccation, and salinity. This chapter also evaluates whether the interaction of UV-B and these other stressors could impact physiological processes in marine organisms, and where multiple-stressor interactions should be considered when determining the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems. Finally, the chapter discusses possible cellular mechanisms for stressor interactions, with an emphasis on oxidative stress, and additional areas for future research.

Keywords:   ultraviolet radiation, stress, algae, invertebrates, pollution, desiccation, ocean acidification, oxidative stress

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