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Plutarch and his Roman Readers$
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Philip A. Stadter

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198718338

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718338.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Plutarch and his Roman Readers
Author(s):

Philip A. Stadter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718338.003.0001

This chapter gives an overview of the book's argument and contents, stressing Plutarch's moral interest in his biographies and his intended special readership of highly placed Roman administrators as well as educated and politically active Greeks. A native of Chaeronea in Boeotia, but a citizen of both Athens and Rome and a priest at Delphi, Plutarch was deeply imbued with all aspects of Greek culture, especially Platonic philosophy, but determined to immerse himself as well in Roman culture and history. His interests can be differentiated from the oral performance culture of rhetors and other members of the second sophistic such as Dio Chrysostom or Aelius Aristides not only because only a few of his works appear to have been delivered orally but because he demonstrates immensely greater familiarity with Roman history, religion, and traditions than they do

Keywords:   Plutarch, morals, biography, second sophistic, Dio Chrysostom, Aelius Aristides, Parallel Lives, readers, Greek culture, Roman history

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