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'Ungainefull Arte'Poetry, Patronage, and Print in the Early Modern Era$
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Richard A. McCabe

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198716525

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716525.001.0001

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The Protocols of Presentation

The Protocols of Presentation

Chapter:
(p.88) 6 The Protocols of Presentation
Source:
'Ungainefull Arte'
Author(s):

Richard A. McCabe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716525.003.0006

This chapter focuses on the materiality of the literary gift, comparing the nature of the scribal and printed presentation copies commonly given by authors to patrons and dedicatees. To this end, it examines three major types of presentation copy: manuscript, print, and hybrid (i.e. where print is personalized in some way by scribal additions or insertions). Beginning with a discussion of the annual custom of New Year’s gift-giving at court, it looks at the ways in which aspiring poets such as Thomas Churchyard, Petruccio Ubaldini, George Gascoigne, and Sir John Harington negotiated the complex protocols of exchange, and the various orthographical strategies through which print attempted to compete with bespoke manuscripts.

Keywords:   paratext, presentation, manuscript, gift economy, book-market, calligraphy, Ubaldini, Gascoigne, Churchyard, Harington

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