Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
'Ungainefull Arte'Poetry, Patronage, and Print in the Early Modern Era$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Richard A. McCabe

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198716525

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716525.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 June 2019

The Arts of Magnificence

The Arts of Magnificence

Early Modern Exemplars

Chapter:
(p.45) 3 The Arts of Magnificence
Source:
'Ungainefull Arte'
Author(s):

Richard A. McCabe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716525.003.0003

This chapter approaches patronal relationships from the patrons’ viewpoint, with particular attention to the Estensi and Medici, to examine how patronage became the art of the powerful and ‘magnificence’ its aesthetic. While Humanists commonly promoted the cultivation of letters as an expression of true nobility, an equally forceful motive was blatant competition between families such as the Sforza, Gonzaga, Medici, and Estensi. The chapter considers the contrasting fortunes of Ugolino Pisani and Leon Battista Alberti at the court of Leonello d’Este, and the relationships between Ficino, Politian, and Lorenzo the Magnificent. Lorenzo’s own poetry is read in conjunction with Politian’s to reveal something of the conflicting ‘authorities’ that patronage invariably entailed.

Keywords:   patronage, magnificence, nobility, Leonello d’Este, Pisani, Alberti, Ficino, Politian, Cosimo de Medici, Lorenzo the Medici

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .