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'Ungainefull Arte'Poetry, Patronage, and Print in the Early Modern Era$
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Richard A. McCabe

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198716525

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716525.001.0001

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Career Trajectories

Career Trajectories

Chapter:
(p.229) 14 Career Trajectories
Source:
'Ungainefull Arte'
Author(s):

Richard A. McCabe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716525.003.0014

This chapter illustrates how three very differently positioned poets—Gascoigne, Spenser, and Daniel—negotiated the conflicting claims of patronage and print, ‘professional’ careerism, and ‘laureate’ status. The section on Gascoigne relates the uncertainty of his authorial persona to the unresolved struggle to find or construct an appropriate social context for a career in writing; that on Spenser considers the problems of writing about courtly or national matters in a colonial context with severely limited access to the levers of patronage; that on Daniel examines the paradoxical problems of attaining the sort of court patronage to which the others aspired, and the artistic limitations imposed by proximity to power.

Keywords:   Inns of Court, book-market, patronage, Gaelic poetry, laureateship, Gascoigne, Spenser, Fenton, Googe, Daniel

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