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Reconceptualizing Development in the Global Information Age$
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Manuel Castells and Pekka Himanen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198716082

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716082.001.0001

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Development as Culture: Human Development and Information Development in China

Development as Culture: Human Development and Information Development in China

Chapter:
(p.116) Chapter 5 Development as Culture: Human Development and Information Development in China
Source:
Reconceptualizing Development in the Global Information Age
Author(s):

You-tien Hsing

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198716082.003.0006

This chapter analyzes the dilemma between China’s impressive internet expansion and the predicament in human development characterized by a prevalent culture of institutional and interpersonal distrust. The distrusting relationship within the citizenry and between the state and society online and offline, has slowed down the insecure state in undertaking substantial reforms, and prevented the weary citizens from organizing transformative networks. The chapter examines China’s developmentalism since the 1980s, fortified by the coalition of the political and economic elite, and its human development, focusing on the commodification of justice and rights, as well as the cultural crisis of distrust under the Chinese model of developmentalism. It suggests the success in China’s information development is more salient in the economic front than the social-cultural front, consistent with the Chinese model of developmentalism.

Keywords:   China, developmentalism, internet, social networks, social disparity, trust

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