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Actual Consciousness$
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Ted Honderich

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198714385

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714385.001.0001

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Need for an Adequate Initial Clarification

Need for an Adequate Initial Clarification

Chapter:
(p.xvi) (p.1) 1 Need for an Adequate Initial Clarification
Source:
Actual Consciousness
Author(s):

Ted Honderich

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714385.003.0001

There is an ordinary division into consciousness in perceiving and consciousness of thinking and of wanting—perceptual, cognitive and affective consciousness. Each of us has a hold on our own consciousness, misnamed introspection, and we have a common sense definition of consciousness. But there is pessimism, greater and lesser, about our coming to a theory or analysis of consciousness in the primary ordinary sense, an account of its nature. Has this been owed in part to the absence of an adequate initial clarification of the consciousness under discussion? To not answering the same question? Has it resulted in particular from a conflation of conscious and unconscious mentality in science in particular but also philosophy? Clearly there is a distinction between, say, dispositional and occurring belief, between knowing where the 43 bus goes when you are having no such thought, and believing it when you are doing so.

Keywords:   perceptual consciousness, cognitive consciousness, affective consciousness, hold on consciousness, unconscious mentality, dispositional belief, occurring belief

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