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Impact of Addictive Substances and Behaviours on Individual and Societal Well-being$
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Peter Anderson, Jürgen Rehm, and Robin Room

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198714002

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714002.001.0001

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Well-being as a framework for understanding addictive substances

Well-being as a framework for understanding addictive substances

Chapter:
(p.53) Chapter 4 Well-being as a framework for understanding addictive substances
Source:
Impact of Addictive Substances and Behaviours on Individual and Societal Well-being
Author(s):

Laura Stoll

Peter Anderson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714002.003.0004

This chapter shows how measures of societal well-being are increasingly being used as a holistic way of measuring societal progress rather than the single measure of GDP. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Framework for Measuring Wellbeing and Progress, including quality of life, material living conditions, and sustainability over time is described. Three examples of the interactions of well-being with addictive substances are given, demonstrating that: quality of life and material living conditions are affected by addictive substances and add to their harm; placing cannabis as an illegal substance impairs quality of life, material living conditions, and sustainability of well-being over time; and, people entering opioid substitution treatment have diminished quality of life and material living conditions, often improved by treatment. Finally, there is no group of countries in Europe whose policies on addictive substances could be described as optimal in promoting quality of life, material living conditions, and sustainability of well-being over time.

Keywords:   well-being, addictive substances, GDP, cannabis, opioid substitution, quality of life

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