Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Impact of Addictive Substances and Behaviours on Individual and Societal Well-being$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Anderson, Jürgen Rehm, and Robin Room

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198714002

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714002.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 December 2019

What are addictive substances and behaviours and how far do they extend?

What are addictive substances and behaviours and how far do they extend?

Chapter:
(p.37) Chapter 3 What are addictive substances and behaviours and how far do they extend?
Source:
Impact of Addictive Substances and Behaviours on Individual and Societal Well-being
Author(s):

Laura A. Schmidt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714002.003.0003

This chapter follows the recent trend in professional psychiatry towards expansion of the addiction concept to include new substances, such as sugar, and new habitual behaviours, such as gambling, Internet gaming, and pornography use. The chapter examines how the addiction concept is itself changing and evolving via the search for a broader explanatory model—a unifying ‘pan-addiction model’—that would provide a single explanatory framework encompassing both substance and behavioural addictions. It is argued that the widening scope of addictive disorders is a response to tangible changes unfolding in the information age, as globalized markets make a greater abundance of pleasurable substances and experiences available to consumers on a 24/7 basis than ever before. Recent discussions around expanding addiction diagnoses reflect psychiatry’s response to growing demand for ways to help individuals achieve hedonic balance in a social context that increasingly fails to support it.

Keywords:   addiction, psychiatry, habitual behaviours, gambling, internet gaming, sugar, hedonic balance

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .