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Impact of Addictive Substances and Behaviours on Individual and Societal Well-being$
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Peter Anderson, Jürgen Rehm, and Robin Room

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198714002

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714002.001.0001

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Addictive substances and behaviours and corruption, transparency, and governance

Addictive substances and behaviours and corruption, transparency, and governance

Chapter:
(p.215) Chapter 11 Addictive substances and behaviours and corruption, transparency, and governance
Source:
Impact of Addictive Substances and Behaviours on Individual and Societal Well-being
Author(s):

David Miller

Claire Harkins

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198714002.003.0011

Well-being is associated, in the case of addictive substances and behaviours, predominantly with either the effect on individuals of substances or behaviours or their impacts on society more broadly. This chapter is concerned with the ways in which corporate and policy actions or inactions have impacts on well-being which are both significant and under-appreciated. These are effects on policy-makers and on policy decisions and the way in which they are implemented and enforced (or not). In examining such processes this chapter highlights corruption and especially institutional corruption and responses to it, including transparency. A range of transparency measures and how effectively they are enforced are reviewed. It is argued that policy responses to enhance well-being should, in addition to comforting those afflicted by addictions, also focus on those economic and policy levers that can have very significant effects downstream in terms of both individual behaviours and the wider societal impact.

Keywords:   corporate actions, policy, institutional corruption, transparency, societal impact

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