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Explaining the Reasons We ShareExplanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 1$
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Mark Schroeder

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198713807

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198713807.001.0001

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The Price of Supervenience

The Price of Supervenience

Chapter:
(p.124) 6 The Price of Supervenience
Source:
Explaining the Reasons We Share
Author(s):

Mark Schroeder

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198713807.003.0007

This chapter explores whether the Standard Model Theory can offer a strategy for answering at least one important form of modal challenge for non-reductive realism in metaethics. Richard Price’s apparent claim that all moral truths are necessary is used as inspiration in order to outline a general strategy for responding to a version of the modal challenge based on Hume’s Dictum that there are no necessary connections between distinct existences. Different implementations of this idea, including one due to T. M. Scanlon, are distinguished, and it is argued that the most promising implementation will draw extensively on the distinction between intrinsic and instrumental goodness or wrongness, and on the Standard Model Theory.

Keywords:   Hume’s Dictum, modal challenge, Richard Price, Standard Model Theory, T. M. Scanlon

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