Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Edward Lear and the Play of Poetry$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Williams and Matthew Bevis

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198708568

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198708568.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 May 2020

Edward Lear

Edward Lear

Celebrity Chef

Chapter:
(p.115) 5 Edward Lear
Source:
Edward Lear and the Play of Poetry
Author(s):

Peter Robinson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198708568.003.0006

The chapter is an exploration of the humour in Edward Lear’s references to food in his poetical writings, his letters, and especially his nonsense recipes. It traces their active ambivalences to his uncertain health, his encounters with other customs and practices, his travels to paint, and his life in exile. With reference to the writings of various cultural theorists, including Mary Douglas and Roland Barthes, it identifies analogous pattern and variety in the structures of both poems and meals, and finds in Lear’s writings on food the makings of an amateur anthropology. It concludes by drawing attention to Lear’s need to sustain life by writing and painting, and how, though his Nonsense has supported generations of readers in the anxieties about feeding, being fed, and manners at table, because he retained no copyright in them, they could not, for him, bring home the bacon.

Keywords:   Edward Lear, food, nonsense recipes, feeding customs, poetic form, structures of meals

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .