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Voices of ConscienceRoyal Confessors and Political Counsel in Seventeenth-Century Spain and France$
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Nicole Reinhardt

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198703686

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198703686.001.0001

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The End of Just War as We Know It?

The End of Just War as We Know It?

Chapter:
(p.106) 5 The End of Just War as We Know It?
Source:
Voices of Conscience
Author(s):

Nicole Reinhardt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198703686.003.0006

Moral theologians believed that they were particularly qualified to examine questions of just war and that in effect just war could not be conducted without previous wide counsel by theologians. On the basis of a wide range of famous and lesser-known moral theologians, this chapter explores how the concept of just war evolved from the middle of the sixteenth century to the early seventeenth century. Probabilism and the challenges of confessional struggle are shown to have contributed to the erosion of the cornerstones of the previously dominant Thomist understanding of just war. Core notions like just possession became increasingly uncertain, while the concept of just cause was overhauled to foreground interior conflict in hitherto unprecedented ways. Eventually, this not only dissolved a coherent concept of just war, but also undermined the argument that theologians were particularly qualified to address the problem, and crucially to contain war.

Keywords:   just war, ius ad bellum, second scholasticism, probabilism, religious war

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