Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Health InequalitiesCritical Perspectives$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Katherine E. Smith, Clare Bambra, and Sarah E. Hill

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198703358

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198703358.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 September 2019

Reflections on the UK legacy of health inequities research, from the perspective of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs)

Reflections on the UK legacy of health inequities research, from the perspective of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs)

Chapter:
(p.69) Chapter 5 Reflections on the UK legacy of health inequities research, from the perspective of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs)
Source:
Health Inequalities
Author(s):

Johanna Hanefeld

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198703358.003.0005

This chapter reflects health inequities from the perspective of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It highlights the difficulties facing those working with extremely limited (often unstable) resources and data, and considers the challenges this situation poses for the idea that popular theories of health inequities can be internationally applied. Where health inequities have been a focus of discussion in LMICs, they have primarily been articulated as inequities in access to health services and/or treatments (in contrast to the focus on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in high-income settings). However, this is now changing with the international spread of NCDs, requiring broader efforts to address social determinants. Despite this, the chapter argues that the challenges to addressing health inequities in LMICs are unlikely to be best served by exporting research, ideas, and interventions from high-income settings. Rather, health inequities may be more effectively challenged via social justice (or rights-based) movements.

Keywords:   LMICs, CSDH, WHO, health inequities, health inequities, social determinants, NCDs, health services, social justice, rights-based, international

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .