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The Secular Clergy in England, 1066–1216$
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Hugh M. Thomas

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198702566

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198702566.001.0001

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Kinship, Household, Hospitality, and Friendship

Kinship, Household, Hospitality, and Friendship

Chapter:
(p.190) 8 Kinship, Household, Hospitality, and Friendship
Source:
The Secular Clergy in England, 1066–1216
Author(s):

Hugh M. Thomas

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198702566.003.0008

Kinship remained a powerful social force among the secular clergy, making even reformers ambivalent about condemning nepotism. However, relationships between clerical uncles and nephews, which were supposed to be close, were often fraught with difficulties. Household relationships were also supposed to be close, but too often produced strife. Hospitality was a major social virtue but invited abuse, as ecclesiastical superiors used rights of hospitality to support their own retinues at the expense of their underlings. Friendship was a strong social bond which many sought to use for religious uplift and encouragement. However, friendship could be abused as well, and a culture of formal friendship was mirrored by a culture of formal enmity.

Keywords:   secular clergy, kinship, household, hospitality, friendship, enmity

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