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The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working
Memory$
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Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie, and Mark D'Esposito

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198570394

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570394.001.0001

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Top-down modulation in visual working memory

Top-down modulation in visual working memory

Chapter:
(p.197) 12 Top-down modulation in visual working memory
Source:
The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory
Author(s):

Adam Gazzaley

Mark D'Esposito

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570394.003.0012

This chapter uses the vehicle of visuospatial representations to explore broader issues of the top down modulation of association cortex linked to activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). One general emerging view from brain imaging, neuropsychological studies, and from single cell recording is that the control and maintenance functions of working memory appear to be linked with PFC activity. This chapter offers both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potential (ERP) data, demonstrating how the PFC might contribute to the inhibition of irrelevant visual information while focusing on and maintaining visual information that is relevant to the task in hand. Some of the recent work using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to induce temporary lesions offers a promising additional source of evidence for this form of top-down modulation of visual processing.

Keywords:   visual memory, working memory, prefrontal cortex, functional magnetic resonance imaging

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