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The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working
Memory$
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Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie, and Mark D'Esposito

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198570394

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570394.001.0001

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Implications from cognitive neuropsychology for models of short-term and working memory

Implications from cognitive neuropsychology for models of short-term and working memory

Chapter:
(p.181) 11 Implications from cognitive neuropsychology for models of short-term and working memory
Source:
The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory
Author(s):

Randi C. Martin

A. Cris Hamilton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570394.003.0011

This chapter points to a feature of serial recall that is less commonly considered, namely that recall is better for real words than it is for nonwords, letters or digits. Performance is even better if the word list comprises a meaningful sentence. This demonstrates an important role for semantic knowledge in immediate serial recall tasks. Conversely, this chapter reports evidence from patients with verbal short-term memory deficits who nevertheless have intact language comprehension, showing that the latter skill does not depend on adequate functioning of the phonological loop. Moreover, amnesic patients appear able to retain semantic information over short periods of time, despite their severe difficulty in accessing long-term memory.

Keywords:   serial recall, semantic knowledge, phonological loop, cognitive neuropsychology, short-term memory

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