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The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working
Memory$
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Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie, and Mark D'Esposito

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198570394

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570394.001.0001

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Accounting for age-related differences in working memory using the feature model

Accounting for age-related differences in working memory using the feature model

Chapter:
(p.165) 10 Accounting for age-related differences in working memory using the feature model
Source:
The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory
Author(s):

Ian Neath

Aimée M. Surprenant

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570394.003.0010

This chapter offers a potential solution by pointing to evidence indicating that word length effects even for forward recall might be unreliable and prone to alternative encoding strategies. It refers to a range of formal models of serial recall and demonstrates how the authors' own feature-based model may account for a range of phenomena associated with verbal serial recall tasks as well as accounting for how these phenomena may differ between younger and older participants. The effects of aging on cognition are extremely complex and it seems likely that age-related differences are due to multiple interactions among factors.

Keywords:   encoding strategies, forward recall, serial recall, aging

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