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Education in Palliative CareBuilding a Culture of Learning$
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Bee Wee and Nic Hughes

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198569855

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198569855.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 October 2019

Interprofessional Education

Interprofessional Education

Chapter:
(p.235) Chapter 22 Interprofessional Education
Source:
Education in Palliative Care
Author(s):

Rod Macleod

Tony Egan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198569855.003.0022

This chapter introduces some theoretical underpinning for the view of interprofessional education in palliative care; discusses the meaning of care in an interprofessional context; suggests ways of developing a shared vision of care; and discusses ways in which one can learn about the delivery of interprofessional care. It also argues that professional caregivers must be responsive to the range of needs of the dying patient and their family. In doing so, they will perform a variety of work, some clearly determined by their scope of practice, but much determined by the unique needs of the patient at any given time. The discussion also suggests that the patient's needs are to be discovered in the patient narrative and ideally lead to a shared vision of care.

Keywords:   patient-centredness, palliative care, interprofessional care, clinical work, professionalism, dying patient

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