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Tall Tales about the Mind and BrainSeparating fact from fiction$
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Sergio Della Sala

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198568773

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568773.001.0001

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Is bigger really better? The search for brain size and intelligence in the twenty-first century

Is bigger really better? The search for brain size and intelligence in the twenty-first century

Chapter:
(p.105) Chapter 8 Is bigger really better? The search for brain size and intelligence in the twenty-first century
Source:
Tall Tales about the Mind and Brain
Author(s):

David P. Carey

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568773.003.0009

Three independent developments in the last decade or so have rekindled interest in relating brain size to cognitive ability both within and across different species. The first has to do with the rapid spread of neuroimaging technology, the second is the explosive growth in a field called behavioural genetics, and the third is a renewed interest in comparative cognition. The obvious conclusion at this stage seems to be that the range of scores on an IQ test of one sort or another is constrained, by the nature of the test, the difficulty of the items, the background and attitudes of the test taker, the time limits imposed for some subtests, and the fact that people have human brains, eyes and hands, all which limit how quickly one processes information and responds to it.

Keywords:   brain size, intelligence, neuroimaging, comparative cognition

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