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Tall Tales about the Mind and BrainSeparating fact from fiction$
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Sergio Della Sala

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198568773

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568773.001.0001

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Setting the record (or video camera) straight on memory: the video camera model of memory and other memory myths

Setting the record (or video camera) straight on memory: the video camera model of memory and other memory myths

Chapter:
(p.60) Chapter 5 Setting the record (or video camera) straight on memory: the video camera model of memory and other memory myths
Source:
Tall Tales about the Mind and Brain
Author(s):

Seema L. Clifasefi

Maryanne Garry

Elizabeth Loftus

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568773.003.0006

The beliefs that people have about memory and how it works drive the way in which they remember as well as the decisions that they make when judging other people's memories. This chapter challenges the notion that memory is permanent by presenting evidence that when people remember experiences, they often incorporate new information or interpret things in line with what they believe to be true now. It demonstrates that people can be confident, emotional, detailed and consistent in their eyewitness testimony and still be wrong about their memories. It shows that false memories can be created precisely because they are not entirely false. They are made up of some true things and some false things combined together to make a false event. One of the most popular and pervasive myths surrounding memory is that it records one's experiences verbatim in the same way that a video camera might.

Keywords:   memories, memory myths, false memories

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