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Tall Tales about the Mind and BrainSeparating fact from fiction$
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Sergio Della Sala

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198568773

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568773.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 August 2019

The dual-brain myth

The dual-brain myth

Chapter:
(p.291) Chapter 18 The dual-brain myth
Source:
Tall Tales about the Mind and Brain
Author(s):

Michael C. Corballis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568773.003.0019

People do have asymmetrical brains, and this is a fact of considerable interest and importance. However, brains are also highly symmetrical, the result of hundreds of millions of years of evolution in a world where the difference between left and right is of virtually no consequence. It is perhaps in the world constructed by humans that the left-right polarity matters most, as in reading and writing, shaking hands in greeting, driving, and so forth, but this is in turn a consequence of asymmetry. Does the dual-brain myth do any harm? It is perfectly acceptable to contrast intuition with reason, or holistic thinking with analytic thinking, or emotion with logic, and it might be argued that there is no harm in linking these polarities with the left and right brains.

Keywords:   right brain, left brain, dual-brain myth, asymmetrical brains

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