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SARSA case study in emerging infections$
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Angela McLean, Robert May, John Pattison, and Robin Weiss

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198568193

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568193.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 September 2019

Animal origins of SARS Coronavirus: possible links with the international trade in small carnivores

Animal origins of SARS Coronavirus: possible links with the international trade in small carnivores

Chapter:
(p.51) CHAPTER 9 Animal origins of SARS Coronavirus: possible links with the international trade in small carnivores
Source:
SARS
Author(s):

Diana J. Bell

Scott Roberton

Paul R. Hunter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198568193.003.0009

This chapter discusses the search for the wildlife reservoir of SARS-CoV. It starts by presenting the case for extending the search for the zoonotic reservoir in terms of both geographical area and the range of species investigated. It highlights regional ecological shifts associated with an illegal international wildlife trade and the growing ‘bush-meat’ trade, which simultaneously favours the emergence of new zoonotic infection risks to humans and poses the primary threat to biodiversity across the Indochina Hotspot. The chapter concludes with the presentation of possible solutions to this problem, including interdisciplinary collaboration with vertebrate and conservation biologists with specialist knowledge of potential host species and the wildlife trade.

Keywords:   wildlife reservoir, ecological shifts, wildlife trade, bush-meat trade, zoonotic infection, biodiversity, Indochina, interdisciplinary collaboration, host species

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