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Cognitive Processes in Eye Guidance | Oxford Scholarship Online
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Cognitive Processes in Eye Guidance

Geoffrey Underwood

Abstract

Whether reading, looking at a picture, or driving, how is it that we know where to look next — how does the human visual system calculate where our gaze should be directed in order to achieve our cognitive aims? Of course, there is an interaction between the decisions about where we should look and about how long we should look there. However, our eyes do not just move randomly over the visual field — whether we are reading, driving, or solving a problem. There are systematic variations not only in the duration of each eye fixation, but also in what we are looking at. It is these variations in ... More

Keywords: visual field, eye fixation, eye movement, cognitive processes, perception

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2005 Print ISBN-13: 9780198566816
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198566816.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Geoffrey Underwood, editor
Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Nottingham

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Contents

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3 Word skipping: Implications for theories of eye movement control in reading

Marc Brysbaert, Denis Drieghe, and Françoise Vitu

4 Identifying compound words in reading: An overview and a model

Jukka Hyönä, Raymond Bertram, and Alexander Pollatsek

6 Eye movement control in reading and the E-Z Reader model

Keith Rayner, Erik D. Reichle, and Alexander Pollatsek

9 Eye movements and visual memory for scenes

John M. Henderson, and Monica S. Castelhano

11 Eye guidance and visual search

John M. Findlay, and Iain D. Gilchrist

14 Perception in chess: Evidence from eye movements

Eyal M. Reingold, and Neil Charness

15 Tracking the eyes to obtain insight into insight problem solving

Günther Knoblich, Michael Öllinger, and Michael J. Spivey