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Dendrites$
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Greg Stuart, Nelson Spruston, and Michael Häusser

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198566564

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198566564.001.0001

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Structural plasticity of dendrites

Structural plasticity of dendrites

Chapter:
(p.499) Chapter 19 Structural plasticity of dendrites
Source:
Dendrites
Author(s):

Anna Dunaevsky

Catherine S. Woolley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198566564.003.0019

Many lines of research have demonstrated structural plasticity of dendrites in the mammalian brain. Historically, the concept of structural plasticity has been incorporated into theories of learning in which structural changes in synaptic connections between neurons are suggested to underlie long-term information storage. However, the fact that circuits encoding learned information are likely to be distributed within and between brain regions, combined with the inability to identify individual cells and synapses involved in learning, makes it difficult to test this hypothesis directly. Even so, a number of experiments have demonstrated consistent experience- or learning-dependent structural changes in dendrites and synapses of cortical structures.

Keywords:   structural plasticity, dendrites, synaptic connections, neurons, brain regions, cortical structures

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