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Measuring the Mind: Speed, control, and age$
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John Duncan, Louise Phillips, and Peter McLeod

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198566427

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198566427.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2019

Reaction time parameters, intelligence, ageing, and death: the West of Scotland Twenty-07 study

Reaction time parameters, intelligence, ageing, and death: the West of Scotland Twenty-07 study

Chapter:
(p.115) Chapter 5 Reaction time parameters, intelligence, ageing, and death: the West of Scotland Twenty-07 study
Source:
Measuring the Mind: Speed, control, and age
Author(s):

Ian J. Deary

Geoff Der

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198566427.003.0005

This chapter uses the West of Scotland Twenty-07 study, a large, population-based, longitudinal study, to describe the relationships between reaction times, psychometric intelligence, ageing, and mortality. Being a representative sample, the IQ scores cover the full range and give higher estimates of the correlation with reaction times than are typical of samples with restricted ranges: -0.49 for four choice reaction time and -0.31 for simple reaction time. The Pearson correlation assumes linearity and with a large sample it is possible to examine this assumption. For four choice reaction time, the relationship is approximately linear, but for simple reaction time it is complex and nonlinear. A novel finding is that women show greater intraindividual variability in choice reaction time across most of the adult age range. The survival of the cohort who were initially aged 56 to 70 is positively associated with IQ.

Keywords:   longitudinal study, reaction times, psychometric intelligence, Pearson correlation, choice reaction time

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